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October 2021

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In This Issue

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From The Editor

Where Is the Money for Carriers?

Oracle Communications, a company that offers cloud-native applications and secure network ...
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Technology for the Enterprise

Distributed Antenna Systems: How Implementing DAS Today Will Help Enterprises Prosper

Although much uncertainty remains as the world continues to move through the COVID-19 pand...
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Technology for the Enterprise

Overcoming Obstacles to Small Cell Construction in New York City and Beyond

Network operators and municipalities across the country are striving to enable 5G wireless...
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Antennas

AT&T Discovery District Showcases Antenna Concealment, Small Cell Poles

Click to watch Don Bishop and Trey Nemeth of Raycap discuss antenna concealment, small cel...
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Safety

Keep Workers Safe From RF Overexposure

The radio connections that everyone depends on for their daily safety, security, communica...
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Infrastructure Opportunities

Future for Infrastructure Provider Is to Own, Operate, Shared Radio Network

Ray LaChance, CEO of ZenFi Networks. A vision for wireless infrastructure provider ZenFi ...
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5G

The Value of Low-Band 5G

Stefan Pongratz, Dell’Oro Group. When T-Mobile first launched 5G wireless communications...
Pekka Lundmark, president and CEO of Nokia. -
Private Networks

Nokia CEO Sees Enormous Potential for Private Networks in 5G

The president and CEO of Nokia, Pekka Lundmark, gave a keynote speech at Mobile World Cong...
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Company News

Bentley Acceleration Initiatives Launches OpenTower iQ, a Digital Co-venture with Visual Intelligence and Aeroprotechnik for 5G Towers

Bentley Acceleration Initiatives has made available OpenTower iQ, a digital twin solution ...
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Wi-Fi

AT&T Brings Secure, Automatic, Friction-Free Public Wi-Fi to Downtown Austin with Passpoint and OpenRoaming

AT&T has completed a proof-of-concept trial of its Wi-Fi network with WBA OpenRoaming ...
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From The Editor

Where Is the Money for Carriers?

Oracle Communications, a company that offers cloud-native applications and secure network infrastructure products, shed light on prospects for wireless communications service providers (CSPs), such as AT&T, Verizon and T-Mobile. The company published a survey titled, “5G Readiness Report: CSP Perceptions on Charging and Monetization for the 5G Era.”

According to the survey, 73 percent of communications service providers intend to launch 5G wireless communications networks by 2022. Notwithstanding, the survey found, 94 percent have problems that stem from the way they charge customers for services.

As communications service providers prepare to make a profit with streaming videos, network slicing, eHealth and virtual gaming, they worry their outdated charging systems will hinder customer experience, performance and the ability to get new offerings to market quickly, according to Oracle Communications.

“Communications service providers are making significant investments in their 5G networks and need to be able to quickly and effectively monetize new services to get a return, as well as deliver on customer expectations,” said Jason Rutherford, senior vice president and general manager for applications at Oracle Communications. “The survey shows that communications service providers recognize they need to rethink current charging systems to fully capitalize on the revenue potential of 5G.”

Meanwhile, U.S.-based consumer research company JD Power surveyed phone customers in December 2020 and found that more than half said that they were unwilling to pay extra for 5G (see Figure 1).

Bar graph showing people's how much more people are willing to pay for 5G service. 53% of people said $0. 19% said $5. 16% said $10. 7% said $20. And 5% said $25 or more.Figure 1. Willingness to pay for 5G service.Source: JD Power, Dec. 21, 2020

It is one thing to figure out ways to charge customers for something. It is another matter to convince them that what they receive is worth paying for. Wireless carriers have a habit of bundling the cost of smartphones with service contracts in such a way that tells customers the smartphones are free. Maybe the wireless carriers have trained their customers to expect that whatever new features 5G wireless service will offer should be free, too, meaning that there should be no increase in their monthly bills.

You can imagine carrier planners asking themselves, “How do we charge for this?” and maybe balancing the answers between how to hide the charges so customers do not notice or how to trumpet the value of the additional service so customers are willing to, and maybe even want to, pay for 5G wireless service.

Customers worry about how to charge the batteries. Carriers worry about how to charge the customers. It’s a beautiful world.

Don Bishop is executive editor and associate publisher.

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Technology for the Enterprise

Distributed Antenna Systems: How Implementing DAS Today Will Help Enterprises Prosper

Changes in data consumption caused by many factors during the COVID-19 pandemic will persist, raising the need multiple facilities have for DAS with the advantage of a managed as-a-service business model.

Although much uncertainty remains as the world continues to move through the COVID-19 pandemic, one unarguable fact has emerged: mobile connectivity is a must. Look no further than your local healthcare facility to find proof. To continue providing care amid office closures during shutdown orders, it’s likely that the facility relied on telehealth services to keep in touch with patients. Telehealth services only work if a facility has a reliable connection from within the venue. Connectivity needs within the healthcare industry are not waning as economies reopen, and the same can be said for enterprises and other businesses across the globe.

Even though businesses that provide in-demand services usually succeed, only those that anticipate future demands will truly prosper. The COVID-19 pandemic proved businesses that lacked the ability to serve employees and customers digitally, struggled. It’s more evident now than ever that healthcare facilities, higher education campuses, hotels, commercial office buildings and other large venues need reliable IT infrastructure to digitally connect with their audience. To support this need, one system that meets this demand and challenge is a distributed antenna system (DAS), a wireless solution that distributes the carrier’s wireless signal uniformly to all parts of the building.

A DAS solution addresses many of the problems that come with other solutions. The signal used to support a DAS is separate from external towers, so there are no concerns with capacity, and because it’s actually a cellular signal that’s being brought into the building, DAS provides a consistent level of service with no danger of network interference. Active calls can seamlessly connect from the network inside the building to the network outside of the building (and vice versa). Strategically placed antennas carry the signal throughout the building, which enables the same level of coverage throughout the building, especially in areas where reception is challenging. A DAS can permeate the trickiest of areas within a building, like the basement or a medical facility’s X-ray room, without issue to ensure consistent and fast communication. Its proven connectivity, reliability and ability to provide near-ubiquitous coverage makes it an attractive option for many types of businesses.

What’s Behind the Uptick in Use of Distributed Antenna System Technology?

Between 2019 and 2024, the global DAS market is expected to experience a compound annual growth rate of 11 percent. In addition to 5G and IoT-related data-intensive applications that demand more connectivity capabilities throughout facilities, sheer volume is also making it necessary to provide near-ubiquitous coverage. The number of IoT devices connected with the internet is expected to more than double from 22 billion in 2018 to approximately 50 billion in 2030.

The rise of IoT devices also is contributing to the growing adoption of smart buildings. These modern, connected buildings use information technology to tie together various systems that otherwise wouldn’t work together, such as lighting, heating and cooling, building security systems and more. A DAS is one of the most reliable ways to provide the coverage necessary to power smart buildings that allow building managers to ensure their facilities are as efficient and sustainable as possible.

Who Can Benefit from DAS Technology?

As we continue to emerge from the COVID-19 pandemic and return to healthcare facilities, higher education campuses, office buildings, shopping establishments, movie theaters, sporting events and more, employees and consumers are bringing COVID-cautious habits with them. Work-from-home arrangements, many now-hybrid models and fewer social gatherings led to record amounts of data being consumed during the pandemic as people turned to streaming services, electronic games and social media for entertainment. Even though economies and offices are reopening, consumers have grown accustomed to their new digital behaviors, and bandwidth demand remains at an all-time high. As consumers retain the desire to stay connected at all times, we’re seeing a variety of enterprises looking for guidance on how best to meet demand.

Although the use case for DAS in large venues, like commercial buildings, was evident before the pandemic as companies adopt digital transformation initiatives, it continues to grow as people return to the office. Major companies like Apple, Microsoft and Google have either announced or are considering ongoing hybrid work arrangements, which will lead to the continued use of video conferencing platforms so that all employees, whether they’re in the office or remote, can stay connected. These bandwidth-heavy platforms will require robust in-building wireless connectivity solutions to support this next phase of worker productivity, post-pandemic.

It’s true that healthcare facilities and educational institutes benefitted from DAS prior to the pandemic. However, the pandemic changed the way we access those services, meaning IT managers at medical offices and schools needed to up their connectivity game. The use of telemedicine sharply rose during the height of COVID, which required medical professionals within healthcare facilities to have reliable connectivity — not to mention the connectivity required to access digital records and communicate with staff and patients. Even though many educational institutions have transitioned back to in-person learning after conducting classes virtually, many students still access lessons via laptops or mobile devices. Schools must be more connected than ever to provide quality education with uninterrupted connectivity.

As shopping malls and hotels reopen, consumers will take their digital behaviors with them. For example, shoppers will require connectivity to access social media channels while browsing stores. Travelers may prefer a streaming service to cable TV in their hotel room. In addition, hotel guests may rather have a touchless check-in experience and the freedom to order dinner from their mobile devices instead of visiting a restaurant. SVP is working with major retailers and premier hospitality venues to design and implement systems that allow consumers to remain connected.

During peak times, large shopping facilities, like malls, and hotels can be densely packed. DAS provides ideal coverage across these facilities at all times. For healthcare facilities, hospitality venues, commercial buildings and schools, the ability to remain connected affects the bottom line, and in emergencies, it can mean the difference in communicating with first responders. No other technology effectively provides the uninterrupted services of a DAS.

How to Make DAS Work for You

Between all elements of managing a facility’s IT system, including identifying the right software, troubleshooting various issues that arise, managing team members and more, finding the time to implement new technology such as DAS seems daunting. Gartner predicts that these, paired with the increasing digital demands IT leaders face in a post-COVID world, are the driving factors behind a growing application infrastructure services market known as platform as a service (PaaS). Adoption of PaaS services, which can include DAS, is expected to grow by 26.6 percent in 2021.

Outsourcing technology improvements is becoming widely popular across verticals. Healthcare facilities commonly outsource many of their recurring needs, like food services, maintenance and even uniform production in order to build and manage a predictable monthly operating budget and prevent large and sometimes unplanned expenses. By applying the same logic to the installation, upgrade and ongoing maintenance of infrastructure, a new managed service model emerges — wireless infrastructure-as-a-service. This compelling option allows facilities to simultaneously convert a substantial capital expenditure with undetermined future costs to a regular, fixed operating expense. This new wireless infrastructure as a service business model successfully addresses the burden of lump sum costs and creates opportunities for venues to reinvest equity, generating a positive return that can be applied back to the business.

Additionally, businesses that adopt as-a-service models are proven to be more agile and scale faster. The ability to access more advanced technology faster leaves room for business leaders to analyze data made available to them and implement better practices. Essentially, taking advantage of as-a-service models frees up valuable human capital so business leaders can focus their efforts where it matters most: improving the customer and employee experience and implementing practices that create stronger business outcomes.

Although a DAS will allow businesses to remain competitive by providing a vehicle to meet modern demands for increased connectivity, partnering the technology with the right partner and a proven managed as-a-service model will give businesses the agility needed to truly prosper.

Justin Marron is CEO of Strategic Venue Partners. A wireless infrastructure development and management firm, SVP offers a holistic suite of connectivity solutions as a managed service. Visit www.strategicvenue.com.

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Technology for the Enterprise

Overcoming Obstacles to Small Cell Construction in New York City and Beyond

It is critical to remove obstacles to small cell construction to facilitate next-generation connectivity to ensure we can survive — and thrive – in an increasingly digital world.

Network operators and municipalities across the country are striving to enable 5G wireless communications mobile services for customers in urban areas, and that requires the installation of thousands of outdoor small cells to meet coverage and capacity demands. The requirements are myriad, from the civil and electrical requirements; the aesthetic requirements (“not in my backyard” or NIMBY) imposed by both private entities and municipal interests; and power company metering/power requirements that vary greatly across the country.

Additionally, the icing on top — organizational and campus settings and private LTE networks — can further inhibit any notion that the motion toward 5G can be streamlined.

Simply put, accommodating the varied technical and aesthetic requirements while also incorporating future and evolving technologies has been and will be a challenge. Wireless construction and infrastructure enterprises see that dichotomy in real time, especially in the tech infrastructure-savvy New York City marketplace.

Site Acquisition and Aesthetics

Throughout the 5G build-out process, wireless construction enterprises have acknowledged that small cells are designed for street-level deployment, but they must also acknowledge that local governments want to provide attractive cityscapes for their residents.

Aside from the pandemic, there have been obstacles to deployment. When it comes to telecom infrastructure and the construction behind 5G deployments, it is easy to overlook what a deployment fully entails. For infrastructure providers, there are federal, state and local permitting, rights of way, application timelines and other siting and application fees, as well as application review timelines or shot clocks.

For businesses, a survey by Gartner, the technology consultancy, shows that enterprises are interested in investing in 5G services and technology as long as those services come with enhanced mobile broadband, are ultra-reliable and operate at low latency. Another Gartner report predicts that less than 45 percent of global communications service providers will have launched a commercial 5G network by 2025. At the enterprise level, mobile service procurement teams must develop realistic estimates or budgets to ensure that devices and connectivity modules are compatible with their carrier’s 5G networks. Additionally, enterprises should look at all of the expected costs of 5G-reliant implementation, demanding service level agreements (SLAs) at every juncture.

Although traditional cell networks have come to rely on an increasing number of base stations, achieving 5G-level performance will require a more comprehensive and expansive infrastructure. Moreover, small cells are the key to densifying networks in preparation for 5G.

Construction That Breaks Through the Challenges

It is hard to keep up with the technical requirements, especially for municipalities and public utilities that might not be as familiar with them as mobile operators might. Enter the construction, design and manufacturing community to work with the ecosystem of stakeholders to design build-out — and concealment — solutions that meet today’s requirements as well as future considerations.

To make that transition, players in the construction field must collaborate with municipal customers to design and install infrastructure that satisfies the ever-growing demand for network capacity, including ultra-fast broadband, 5G networks and densified fiber deployments.

Those construction crews, foremen, electricians and laborers must understand the importance of responsiveness and on-time delivery for projects of all sizes. Successful companies will be able to demonstrate expertise in all aspects of construction — from design and engineering through construction and installation — all with safety as a backdrop.

Still, challenges exist, and there are ways to overcome those challenges.

One way to get there is through standardization. Initial small cell deployments were custom installations requiring site-by-site engineering, which made these installations too expensive for widespread use. Today, telecom equipment manufacturers are moving to standardize small cell deployment solutions. It would not be cost-effective to perform custom engineering for each cell site deployment, so solutions must be based on standard designs that can, in turn, be adapted for many different sets of technical and aesthetic requirements.

Modularity is also important. A broad selection of modular solutions is critical to ensuring successful small cell deployment, particularly in urban areas. Site components must support a wide range of deployment scenarios, like locating the radio adjacent to the antenna or placing the radio at the opposite end of a pole from an antenna.

Another ingredient is aesthetics. Cities and municipalities want the benefits of 5G, but they do not necessarily want to hang unsightly boxes from their streetlights or utility poles, hence the need for concealment. The good news is that manufacturers are building site concealment into their designs to ease aesthetic concerns and have come up with a wide variety of options, from streetlight poles to wall-mounted enclosures disguised as street signs

New York Minute

To facilitate build-outs, New York public utilities and municipalities may look to explore synergies with other infrastructure projects like distributed power systems, smart meter conversion and coupling fiber builds with street improvements to decrease the time and costs in the long haul.

5G will play a key role in closing the digital divide with faster speeds, expanded capacity and lower latency. The overwhelming majority of Americans — 81 percent in 2019 — own a smartphone, giving mobile devices an opportunity to address the lack of connectivity.

With the economy slowly but steadily rebounding from the pandemic, New York and the United States more broadly cannot afford to lose competitive footing. It is critical that municipalities, carriers and companies like Hellman Electric work together to remove obstacles to small cell construction to facilitate next-generation connectivity to ensure we can survive — and thrive – in an increasingly digital world.

Tom Caruso is vice president of operations at Hellman Electric’s Datacom Division, a full-service electrical and telecommunications contractor providing design, installation and maintenance of telecommunications networks, with services offered individually, bundled or on a turnkey basis. Visit www.hellmanelectric.com.

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Antennas

AT&T Discovery District Showcases Antenna Concealment, Small Cell Poles

A portion of downtown Dallas receives improved commercial wireless communications coverage thanks in part to antenna installations that rely on projects carried out by Raycap.

Click to watch Don Bishop and Trey Nemeth of Raycap discuss antenna concealment, small cell poles.

Concealed antennas on the side of a granite-faced building that Raycap installed in the AT&T Discovery Center in Dallas use the company’s InvisiWave 5G millimeter-wave (mmWave) RF-friendly technology. Additionally, Raycap installed artistic-looking poles for small cells near the district.

“These types of projects we consider to be a feather in our cap, especially when we’re doing work that’s on the building that belongs to one of the wireless operators,” said Trey Nemeth, the company’s senior vice president of small cell and research and development, and general manager. “This is a very interesting and challenging project that we worked on and completed over the course of the past year.”

box made of InvisiWave 5G millimeter-wave (mmWave) RF-friendly technology conceals wireless communications antennas.Mounted on the side of the building above the stairway landing, a box made of InvisiWave 5G millimeter-wave (mmWave) RF-friendly technology conceals wireless communications antennas.

For the building, Raycap had to develop concealment boxes that not only do not degrade 5G millimeter-wave signals using InvisiWave technology, the company had to manufacture the boxes in a way that precisely matched the appearance of existing building, which Nemeth said was a challenge. For the poles, Raycap incorporated a Pegasus symbol that represents Mobil, an American oil company that for many years had its headquarters in the district.

“The finished result is an artistic-looking pole that does a great job of fitting in with the downtown area,” Nemeth said. “The pole applications are definitely interesting and have some really neat nuances. I invite anyone in the Dallas area to check them out. Look for the Pegasus logos, and you’ll see the poles that I’m talking about.”

Concealment Materials

Hiding antennas behind panels that match architectural appearances is something Raycap has been doing for decades, Nemeth said, and the installation in Dallas is an extension of that work. He said that as technologies increased, Raycap has improved its products, coming up with different ways to closely match appearances.

“The material had to be tested for durability and for RF performance,” Nemeth said. “We look at the effect the material has on the strength of the signal that passes through — how much dB loss we see. More importantly, and perhaps a more challenging test to quantify, is what effect does the material have on the antenna pattern. These are among several tests we performed to gain approvals and start using this material. We have successfully deployed it on many sites over the past two years, since we got it approved.”

Speaking of the expertise required for the testing, Nemeth said, “There’s no playbook that’s written for this. These types of testing programs require negotiations with carriers to find out what’s going to satisfy their RF engineering departments.”

In addition, Nemeth said, Raycap first has to make sure the concealment material suits manufacturing requirements.

“You can you can put a lot of different materials in front of an antenna or in front of a radio and have reasonable performance from an RF perspective, but the question is does the material perform for the purpose that it’s intended?” he asked. “Can you manufacture it into the different shapes that are required? Does it have the structural capacity? We have to go through many materials that don’t pass those initial tests before we arrive at maybe a handful that we like. Then, we proceed with the more stringent RF testing and the other tests that are involved.”

The antenna concealment panels from Raycap are made to match the appearance of the granite-like siding on the Whitacre Building in the AT&T Discovery District in Dallas. Another concealment mounted on the side of the building near a window allows the RF energy from the antennas inside to pass through virtually unaffected. Another concealment mounted on the side of the buildingRaycap’s artist technology team applied the finished surface appearance to the InvisiWave concealment material to allow it to blend with the building façade.

Project Timeline

Although Raycap can conduct projects like the AT&T Discovery District as fast as six to eight weeks, Nemeth said others could take longer than that. He said the reason they can take more time has nothing to do with the manufacturing or engineering process or the development of the solution, which Raycap can accomplish quickly. He said it has more to do with obtaining approvals.

“The AT&T Discovery District project fell into that category,” Nemeth said. “It took a long time from inception to generation of concept drawings and photo simulations, and all of the things required to obtain approvals from the powers that be, which are substantial. You have representatives from the carrier; you have representatives from the building owner or landlord and representatives of the city or municipality in order to get permitting. Those steps sometimes take months or years. However, if all of those things are in line, for us to do our job effectively is just a matter of a few weeks, typically. There’s a lot of waiting and starts and stops before we get to that point, however.” Raycap has hundreds of such projects going on simultaneously, Nemeth said.

Many people at Raycap, working in various segments of its business, have to touch and be involved with a project, Nemeth said, starting with the sales department and estimating trying to figure out how to build it and coming to understand what the customer needs. Next, a project works its way through the engineering department and fabrication drawing process, he said. Then, from a manufacturing and production standpoint, the project draws upon everyone from steel workers to technicians who are manufacturing composite parts, such as the concealment boxes. Nemeth said that then, the artist technology team takes the project to applying the finished surface appearance to the boxes. “It’s a substantial number of people, by the time we get it from start to finish,” he said.

Business Sources

Most of Raycap’s customers for antenna concealment and small cell poles are the wireless carriers, Nemeth said, although sometimes the company works directly with proprietors and building owners, especially large commercial operators. He said that when Raycap performs work with those types of customers, it has been a good situation because Raycap is able to understand directly what their needs are. However, he said, bridging the gap with putting a viable antenna concealment on a building, for example, and attracting a tenant, like one of the wireless operators — that is a different story.

Small cell pole concealing an antenna and providing light for the streetThe small cell pole holds not only an antenna canister on top and an equipment housing at the base, it holds a light for the street and another for the pedestrian walkway.

As a result, he said, the vast majority projects come directly through the wireless operators, after they have negotiated at least on paper or in a verbal agreement, in general how the result should look. “Then, they turn to us to turn that into reality and help support them with their negotiations through the generation of concept drawings and photo simulations to help support the process through,” Nemeth said. The FCC’s release of C-band spectrum for commercial wireless communications holds promise for additional business for Raycap, Nemeth said.

the AT&T Discovery DistrictIn the AT&T Discovery District, a Raycap small cell pole helps to densify 5G wireless communications in Dallas. a Raycap small cell poleOn a Raycap small cell pole, a Pegasus symbol echoes a past when American oil company Mobil had its headquarters in the AT&T Discovery District area.

“Upcoming C-band installations are a hot topic, and it’s important to note that the materials that we use for these rooftop and pole concealment applications are approved for C-band deployments,” he said. “They are forward-thinking in that way, and they’re future-proof, in a way, to be able to accept these new technologies as they come out.

“We’re starting to see a lot of action already,” Nemeth said. “It’s definitely the buzz. I think there’ll be a lot of deployment and a lot of reliance on the C-band frequencies to support the larger propagation of 5G technology.”

Don Bishop is executive editor and associate publisher.

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Tower of the Month

Site Name: Dawn’s Light

Tower Owners: CCATT (Crown Castle International)
American Tower

Height: 228 feet

Year Constructed: 2010

Photography by Don Bishop

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Safety

Keep Workers Safe From RF Overexposure

The 5G-ready personal RF monitor helps tower workers and others who perform work near sources of RF energy to maintain a safe distance.

The radio connections that everyone depends on for their daily safety, security, communication and entertainment are most effectively delivered to devices from a considerable height above their surrounding area. This makes towers, rooftops, utility poles and other structures the best locations for transmitters and antennas. Anyone who works near radio transmitters must understand radio-frequency (RF) radiation hazards and must have the required training for associated safe working practices.

Devices that generate RF radiation, once installed, should indicate a safe working environment for those working in close proximity to these devices, including tower climbers, rooftop workers and bucket truck workers. Distance is particularly important, because power density decreases, both horizontally and vertically, the farther away from the source these workers are. Therefore, exposure decreases, the greater the distance or the higher up the antenna is from the workers. There are two overarching considerations to ensure safe working around transmitting antennas: Workers should not be exposed to levels of RF radiation exceeding the limits, and they must use a personal RF monitor to effectively measure the combined level of exposure from multiple sources present in accordance with FCC guidelines.

RF monitor model fieldSENSE60The RF monitor model fieldSENSE60 can be attached to a harness-attachment mechanism to ensure it cannot be dropped, yet still within hearing range of the buzzer in the event of a warning.

Since 2009, FieldSense has focused on designing products to protect workers while they perform jobs near broadcast and telecommunications antennas. Its flagship product is the fieldSENSE60 personal RF monitor, an affordable, robust device that protects workers from RF overexposure when working around broadcast and telecommunications antennas.

fieldSENSE60 RF monitorThe fieldSENSE60 RF monitor covers 50 MHz to 60 GHz.

Measuring the exposure levels using a personal RF monitor is a reliable way to understand the exposure conditions around transmitting antennas. It allows workers to quickly quantify and move away from the risky area to a safe area. A personal RF monitor is an ideal tool to identify the presence of RF radiation both during an initial assessment and while work is underway. Personal RF monitors can alert workers to potential exposures by sounding an alarm when the exposure level is exceeded. It is important that workers are trained properly to use these devices and maintain them in accordance with regulations and manufacturer specifications, especially ensuring that they are calibrated by the manufacturer themselves.

RF exposure guidelines are detailed by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP), the FCC, Safety Code 6 and the EU Directive. In order to keep workers safe in accordance with these guidelines, they need to be able to correctly assess their exposure conditions. To this end the FieldSense devices measure both the electric (E) and the magnetic (H) fields to ensure an accurately shaped response over frequency.

“We leverage our strengths to ensure we are offering our clients the best possible product, as well as world-class customer service at the best possible price point,” said Max Birch, FieldSense CEO. “We aim to simplify RF safety by focusing on the core requirements and doing these well. Our goal is to move the industry forward by keeping the workers in the field safe on the job.”

The fieldSENSE60 covers the frequency range from 50 MHz to 60 GHz and is specifically designed with the telecommunications worker in mind. Whether work takes place in the near field of a broadcast system or in the far field of a 5G system, exposure is correctly assessed, and a warning is sounded, should the RF levels approach or exceed occupational health and safety limits.

The device can be attached to a special harness mechanism to ensure it cannot be dropped yet remain within hearing range of the buzzer in the event of an overexposure warning. The device has a built-in fall detection alarm so that, should there be a fall, other climbers are immediately made aware, and a rescue can be initiated.

The device has an advanced E and H field data logger which records all user measurements so that they can be easily accessed over a USB connection to a PC during or after exposure. To make life easier for the worker, there is a unique voice note function that allows for hassle-free notetaking, which is synced with the exposure records.

Samantha Gush is marketing manager at FieldSense. Email FieldSense at [email protected], or visit www.fieldsense.com.

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Infrastructure Opportunities

Future for Infrastructure Provider Is to Own, Operate, Shared Radio Network

The concept of virtual infrastructure and ZenFi Networks owning and operating its own shared radio network will become the company’s primary business, the company’s CEO said.

Ray LaChance, CEO of ZenFi Networks.Ray LaChance, CEO of ZenFi Networks.

A vision for wireless infrastructure provider ZenFi Networks has it owning and operating its own radio network, said the company CEO, Ray LaChance. Already pursuing the concept of virtual infrastructure, ZenFi has brought together edge collocation facilities, fiber-optic cable routes and wireless access points to be able to offer wireless carriers turnkey solutions for densifying their networks. The single source helps the carriers to meet objectives for 5G wireless communications network construction with requirements for high capacity, low latency and gapless coverage.

“ZenFi and companies like us are really focused on creating underlying infrastructure, physical space, power and connectivity that we allow others to leverage to build value-added applications on top,” LaChance said. “They build their networks on top of our network. We’re the underlying provider, so our customers are our partners. We want to see them succeed. We want to build a robust fabric that they can do what they want to do.”

Thanks to the FCC making available shared radio-frequency spectrum, LaChance said, the wireless infrastructure business will evolve into virtual infrastructure, with infrastructure companies operating their own radio networks. He said that would enhance their ability to collaborate with carriers, because sharing reduces the cost to individual carriers of placing physical infrastructure.

“When we go and procure a light pole or put street furniture out there to put a radio on, there’s a huge cost to that,” LaChance said. “To put a single Verizon radio or an AT&T radio on it is very costly. Imagine if we could put our own radio. We could share it across 20 or 30 potential customers.” Additional customers could be mobile virtual network operators (MVNOs) that contract to use the network facilities of real network operators.

...our customers are our partners. We want to see them succeed. We want to build a robust fabric that they can do what they want to do. — Ray LaChance

ZenFi already installs applications in the mobile edge facilities it owns to handle baseband processing for the mobile operators, LaChance said. The edge data centers that process fronthaul fiber out to radioheads represent an opportunity for a new ecosystem of data centers to expand out to smaller footprints from 2,000 to 5,000 square feet, he said. ZenFi has purchased buildings for a few such facilities, LaChance said. “We’re building out their little data center bunkers to house this mobile edge,” he said.

Such data centers have to be built, or they have to be retrofitted to other facilities, as with existing central offices. LaChance sees that as a huge opportunity, but still part of the whole data center. “It’s not the massive, multi-hundred thousand square-foot data center,” he said. “These are distributed smaller facilities. You don’t get the same economy as a set scale, but when you combine it with your wireless siting business, your fiber-optic business and your edge data center and you do that turnkey, you get great economies of scale on it.”

Pointing to the large U.S. wireless carriers having committed to spending upward of $90 billion for spectrum in the FCC C-band auction, LaChance said the carriers would have to deal with that sum from a balance sheet perspective. He said it probably contributed to some of the slowdown in decision-making and issuance of new deals with ZenFi.

“The silver lining there, though, for intermediaries or shared infrastructure players — neutral-host players in our space — is, if the carriers want to have the coverage and capacity anywhere and everywhere they need to put it, the only way to go is shared infrastructure,” LaChance said.

“Infrastructure companies are taking some of that balance sheet risk on ourselves, but we are spreading the risk around to multiple players,” he said. “We’re going to evolve toward more than just three carriers. As we move to virtual infrastructure and virtualizing the radio network, we’re going to end up with 20 big worldwide MVNOs, and then private network overlays for mobile and fixed wireless applications, and IoT. There’s just going to be a lot of stuff overlaid on it.”

LaChance said that he expects that that the concept of virtual infrastructure and ZenFi owning and operating its own shared radio network will become the company’s primary business. He said the company intends always to be an infrastructure player.

“We’re not going after the retail opportunity,” he said. “We’re not a telecom services player; we’re underlying infrastructure. But we’re extending that infrastructure to radio spectrum. To do that, we have to own and operate our own our own radio network.”

LaChance spoke during the “Evolving Shared Wireless Infrastructure Landscape” fireside chat session during the Metro Connect USA 2021 meeting in February, where Jennifer Fritzsche, chief financial officer of Canopy Wireless, interviewed him. Fritzsche also is a managing director of communications services and digital infrastructure at Greenhill & Co.

Don Bishop is executive editor and associate publisher.

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5G

The Value of Low-Band 5G

The time is right to start becoming excited about the low band – sub-1 GHz deployments are expected to comprise a greater share of the future 5G capex.

Stefan PongratzStefan Pongratz, Dell’Oro Group.

When T-Mobile first launched 5G wireless communications service in the 600 MHz spectrum, preparing to become the first operator to advertise and offer 5G nationwide, it said, “We are building a truly mobile 5G so everyone can benefit from the 5G revolution.”

With 5G now proliferating rapidly across the globe and as more operators adopt a multiband-based spectrum strategy, including not just mid-band, but also high-band and low-band spectrum, the timing is right to review the various 5G options, discuss the benefits with low-band spectrum and assess the status with sub-1 GHz 5G new radio (NR) deployments.

Not all 5G is the same. One of the more compelling aspects of 5G is that there are so many different 5G technologies and flavors to support a confluence of use cases with different performance requirements. Additionally, the spectrum will play an important role. At a highly simplified level, there are three broad 5G categories from a spectrum perspective, including low-band – ideal for coverage, high-band – ideal for capacity, and the mid-band – ideal for coverage and capacity (see Figure 1).

Figure 1Figure 1. 5G NR spectrum bands. Low-band is ideal for coverage; high-band is ideal for capacity; and the mid-band is ideal for coverage and capacity.

Moreover, from a spectrum and transceiver perspective, there are, at a high level, five different 5G NR networks, including  (1) sub-1 GHz NR, (2) upper mid-band massive MIMO, (3) 2 GHz 8T8R and FDD massive MIMO, (4) 6 GHz NR, and (5) millimeter-wave (mmWave). [8T8R refers to 8 transmit and 8 receive antenna elements; i.e., 16 total antenna elements. FDD is frequency-division duplex. Massive MIMO is a multi-user (multiple-input multiple-output) antenna technology that can provide uniformly good service to wireless terminals in high-mobility environments.] (See Table 1.)

Table 1Table 1. 5G NR by spectrum from low-band to high-band, and by transceiver configuration (number of transmit and receive antennas).

Not surprisingly, mid-band 5G NR has dominated the capital expense (capex) spending mix in this initial 5G wave, propelling cumulative 2018–2020 massive MIMO NR investments to approach $10 billion to $20 billion. At the same time, low-band NR activity is firming up, validating the message that operators and suppliers have communicated for some time, namely that all spectrum will eventually become 5G spectrum.

Although the spectral efficiency uplift between low-band LTE and NR is rather small (10 to 20 percent), assuming all else equal, both greenfield and brownfield operators are starting to realize that the low band will play an important role in the broader 5G strategy to expand coverage, minimize the digital divide and improve indoor performance.

A comparison of LTE and 5G NRFigure 2. A comparison of LTE and 5G NR base transceiver station shipments for macro towers versus small cells during a seven-year period shows small cell use increasing much more.

The inherent propagation characteristics with sub-1 GHz spectrum and the resulting coverage benefits will enable operators to build a base layer that will serve as the foundation to expand the geographic and population coverage nationwide.

Also helping to explain the renewed interest in the sub-1 GHz NR is the role the spectrum can play to minimize the digital divide. COVID- 19 is a call for governments across the world to reexamine their broadband capabilities and increase their respective subsidization efforts to minimize the digital divide with comprehensive broadband solutions designed to handle the peak requirements of today and tomorrow. Although broadband inequities remain significant, a string of indicators suggest governments are working to improve connectivity access – the number of countries with a national broadband plan approached 174 in 2020, up from 102 in 2010 (The State of Broadband 2020: Tackling Digital Inequalities – International Telecommunications Union and United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization).

Indoor wireless remains a challenge. Preliminary feedback from some of the early mid-band adopters also suggests that the gap between macro and small cells will be much narrower with upper mid-band deployments relative to sub-2 GHz systems, reflecting the propagation characteristic with the higher operating frequencies and technology limitations to address outdoor to indoor losses. Given the incremental volumes required to improve the performance indoors, the low-band spectrum can help to reduce the indoor capex.

China Mobile’s recently announced 700 MHz tender, involving 480,000 5G NR base stations, will provide a significant boost to the low-band ecosystem. This, combined with the benefits previously mentioned and the fact that there are some 400 operators globally operating LTE or 5G NR networks in the low-band (GSA), forms the basis for the improved low-band market sentiment.

In short, the upper mid-band and massive MIMO drove the initial 5G ascent. The time is right to start becoming excited about the low band – sub-1 GHz deployments are expected to comprise a greater share of the future 5G capex.

Stefan Pongratz, vice president and analyst, joined Dell’Oro Group in 2010, where he is responsible for the firm’s mobile RAN market and telecom capex research programs. Visit www.delloro.com.

Pekka Lundmark, president and CEO of Nokia. -
Pekka Lundmark, president and CEO of Nokia.
Private Networks

Nokia CEO Sees Enormous Potential for Private Networks in 5G

The threat of network outages is one of the main reasons why mission-critical industries such as railways and mines often choose to build their own private networks.

The president and CEO of Nokia, Pekka Lundmark, gave a keynote speech at Mobile World Congress 2021 in which he spoke of 5G wireless communications, critical networks and what the post-COVID future holds. In a written version released by Nokia, Lundmark said that in the first two months of 2021, Nokia announced a stream of new deals with its traditional customer base of telcos, others with webscales, government agencies, commercial ports, transport hubs and other partners.

“Our work with this diverse and global base of customers has shown us what businesses of all types want from their connectivity in the time of COVID-19 and beyond. Increasingly, they are looking for three key characteristics,” Lundmark said.

The Nokia executive said the company’s customers first want carrier-grade performance that can transport and process vast amounts of data quickly and with six-nine (99.9999%) reliability. Customers want connectivity that can provide wired levels of performance and resilience wirelessly.

He said that second, customers want connectivity with the elasticity, flexibility and self-definition that normally associated with webscales. “It must adapt, evolve and maintain peak performance no matter what demands are placed on it,” he said.

The third, and a crucial, aspect he said customers want is connectivity that can underpin their most important functions on critical networks.

Elaborating on critical networks, Lundmark said it is an important point. He said that for consumers, a network outage could be annoying. However, for industry, it can be deadly, as safety programs lag or autonomous robots can no longer track nearby people. He said the threat of network outages is one of the main reasons why mission-critical industries such as railways and mines often choose to build their own private networks.

“Until recently, industries only had access to licensed narrowband spectrum and, as a result, they could only deploy voice and low-speed data on their private networks,” Lundmark said. “But with private and public 5G, industries can support a whole host of new applications and use cases.”

Some of these use cases are wide-area, such as connected fleets of trains, while some are hyper-local, such as specific factories or solar arrays,” Lundmark said. He said the fusion of big capacity with specific needs is the future. “We are back to big small tech,” he said.

Calling the advance exciting, Lundmark said it nevertheless could seem to be abstract. To reveal a clearer idea of the potential the future connectivity holds, he referred to statistics Nokia has seen from early use cases.

“Our partners saw unanticipated breakdowns and production line defects drop by 30 percent after installing smart video sensors in our manufacturing deployments,” Lundmark said.” In the logistics sector, deploying augmented reality devices cut machine-monitoring costs by half. In ports, remote-controlled cranes doubled productivity and eliminated staff injuries — an incredible 100 percent drop. Remember, we are still early in the cycle of digitalization. So as positive as these early results are, we can realistically expect them to get even better as 5G beds in.”

A Nokia Bell Labs paper, ‘Industrial IoT networks: how 5G is transforming industry verticals’, explains how 5G can replace wired Ethernet in standard industrial control protocols, support real-time service alteration, enable private edge cloud, power machine learning and analytics, and unlock widespread deep slicing. According to Lundmark, all of these have huge, positive implications for CAPEX, OPEX, productivity, and sustainability and worker safety.

“It will take work and time,” he said, “but there is a huge appetite for change and improvement across business, enterprise and industry. We predict that every dollar of investment in network and cloud infrastructure will provide more than four dollars of end-user value creation. The result is we are looking at an economic gain of up to seven percent of global GDP, or $8 trillion, by 2030. Elsewhere, if the gain is that high in economic terms, imagine what it means for productivity, equality or sustainability.”

According to Lundmark, “the technology is a game-changer. It allows us to look to the future with optimism, in the knowledge that connectivity will make people safer, communities more prosperous and businesses more innovative. A future of big small tech awaits us. I am proud that Nokia is making it a reality.”

Don Bishop is executive editor and associate publisher.

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Company News

Bentley Acceleration Initiatives Launches OpenTower iQ, a Digital Co-venture with Visual Intelligence and Aeroprotechnik for 5G Towers

Bentley Acceleration Initiatives has made available OpenTower iQ, a digital twin solution supported by iTwin for telecommunications towers that provides 3D visualization, real-time decision support and predictive design from the ground up. The product resulted from a digital co-venture between Bentley and Visual Intelligence, a Houston-based sensor technology company, and Aeroprotechnik, an aerial inspection engineering company based in Viseu, Portugal.

Bentley Acceleration Initiatives is Bentley Systems’ strategic investment fund and incubator initiative. Its objective is to bring together ecosystem partners in a digital co-venture to accelerate the marketing of creative cloud solutions based on the Bentley iTwin platform. OpenTower iQ, as supported by iTwin, is an example of co-venturing that combines digital technologies from other companies to address a market need.

As the demand for data continues to grow, tower companies and engineering firms are looking for all-inclusive, engineering-grade solutions to collocate, modify and maintain telecom infrastructure for the 5G rollout. OpenTower iQ facilitates modifying existing towers and maintaining accurate models, automating the repetitive work of producing as-built models and using artificial intelligence to detect critical components.

Tower companies can use OpenTower iQ to monitor the health of their towers and gain access to shared, secured data through an easy-to-understand portal. Data analytics provide cost-benefit analysis to boost operational efficiency and ensure that all possible revenue is collected. Improved accuracy of tower inspections and smart inventory management saves time, cost, and improves safety. The new product is designed to handle the large asset portfolios of operators, easily processing and analyzing tens of thousands of towers.

With OpenTower iQ, we’re enabling new applications of drone data and accelerating the value of digital twins to tower companies worldwide. — Ted Miller, Visual Intelligence

To accelerate the launch of OpenTower iQ, Bentley Acceleration Initiatives acquired digital twin technology from Aeroprotechnik, an aerial inspection engineering company that specializes in automated asset data capture and digitalization solutions. The technology included artificial intelligence and reality modeling capabilities that provide detailed information on current site conditions, which helps tower companies speed up rollouts, enhance decision-making and shorten sales cycles. Bentley Acceleration Initiatives also partnered with Visual Intelligence, whose patented dual-sensor drone technology digitalizes physical infrastructure with millimeter accuracy to reliably deliver 3D, engineering-grade asset intelligence. Visual Intelligence is able to map more measurable surface area than alternative aerial and ground-based methods. Its patented drone sensor technology has the unique ability to capture the components of a tower, including bolts, wires, ladders and other items, with an extremely high degree of accuracy that was not previously possible.

With a comprehensive, millimeter-accurate digital twin, a tower company can virtually inspect a tower, see if it has been constructed correctly, determine whether the tower’s structural integrity is intact, and run collocation scenarios. Unlike rudimentary reality models produced from other cameras, Visual Intelligence enables a digital twin with such accuracy that it can support advanced analyses, such as connection integrity analysis and mount mapping analysis.

According to Santanu Das, senior vice president and chief acceleration officer of Bentley Acceleration Initiatives, the company’s objective is to incubate new businesses and augment existing ones using Bentley iTwin technologies.

“We provide a go-to-market accelerator to rapidly bring to users the innovative ideas from Bentley’s research and development in partnership with emerging industry leaders and technology specialists such as Visual Intelligence and Aeroprotechnik,” Das said. “Bentley Acceleration Initiatives helped incubate OpenTower iQ by funding its development, seeking out technology partnerships to fill whitespaces and creating a comprehensive go-to-market strategy.”

Das said the next step is to invite additional interested ecosystem partners to start new digital integrator services to capture emerging opportunities for enterprise integration and implementation for towers.

“The telecom industry is going through a rapid transformation as multinetwork operators are expanding their portfolios through consolidation and moving from a 4G platform to 5G,” Das said. “Without a doubt, digital twin solutions like OpenTower iQ will help tower owners make the most of the industry’s burgeoning opportunities.”

Nikhil Jani, vice president of telecom and utilities at Genesys International, said that OpenTower iQ for tower planning and management is what he called a game-changer for the telecom market. “Within a couple of days, we had a high-quality reality model available with the reports and other aspects of the projects,” he said. “Now, all the tower data is available in digital form, and it’s accurate and current.”

Ted Miller, founder and chairman of Visual Intelligence and a former chairman and CEO of Crown Castle International, said that until now, drone data has failed to live up to its promise to the tower industry. He said this is largely because survey-grade drone sensors cannot collect the fidelity of data required to extract engineering-grade tower intelligence.

“Our patented drone sensor technology is the first of its kind to collect millimeter-class tower information,” Miller said. “We partnered with Bentley to utilize OpenTower iQ to translate this new fidelity of data into as-built digital twins and then apply AI to automate and unlock new kinds of tower insights. With OpenTower iQ, we’re enabling new applications of drone data and accelerating the value of digital twins to tower companies worldwide.”

Nuno Marques, founder of Aeroprotechnik, said that Bentley Acceleration Initiatives “proved to be an effective platform for ecosystem partners like Aeroprotechnik to scale up artificial intelligence-based solutions, transforming emerging technologies into real value for Bentley’s users.”

Source: Visual Intelligence

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Wi-Fi

AT&T Brings Secure, Automatic, Friction-Free Public Wi-Fi to Downtown Austin with Passpoint and OpenRoaming

AT&T continues its commitment to provide super-fast, secure and reliable Wi-Fi access supporting smart city innovation.

AT&T has completed a proof-of-concept trial of its Wi-Fi network with WBA OpenRoaming in areas of downtown Austin, Texas, along 6th street and outside of Stubbs BBQ, according to the Wireless Broadband Alliance (WBA). The network showcases the future of public Wi-Fi, where OpenRoaming provides secure, automatic and friction-free access to any device using their public Wi-Fi network.

AT&T is the first major operator to trial deployment of WBA OpenRoaming in a high-density city network. WBA OpenRoaming frees users from constantly re-registering or re-entering log-in credentials, enabling the convenience of instant network access, enterprise-grade security and a carrier-grade Wi-Fi experience.

Sign of 6th Street in Downtown Austin, TXWireless Broadband Alliance OpenRoaming in Austin, Texas, served areas along 6th Street with Wi-Fi in a proof-of-concept trial.

Widespread easy access to public Wi-Fi in Austin provides residents with services in the downtown area. Although this service is initially a trial proof of concept, the future for OpenRoaming is one in which citizens would be able to stay connected in virtually any location across a city without worrying about potential security risks, ensuring cities and public spaces are more friendly to businesses, visitors and residents alike.

In the context of city deployments of WBA OpenRoaming, future deployments can see public Wi-Fi access in schools, libraries and other public domains, as demonstrated in Europe with the WiFi4EU initiatives, enabling secure access to the internet for research, schooling and business activities. The Canary Wharf deployment in the United Kingdom already has transformed the business district into a connected hub, allowing citizens to roam from street level to high-rise offices while staying seamlessly connected with OpenRoaming-enabled Wi-Fi.

Photo of people walking down 6th Street in Downtown Austin, TXUsing WBA OpenRoaming, walkers on 6th Street in downtown Austin, Texas, had secure, automatic and friction-free access to Wi-Fi on an AT&T proof-of-concept system.

Hotels, conference centers, restaurants, bars and retailers all stand to benefit from OpenRoaming technology. Good Wi-Fi, for instance, remains one of the top-three reasons individuals choose one hotel over another. The technology also presents brands with countless opportunities to increase consumer engagement as they become part of a connected city experience, such as promoting special offers to individuals when they are near the premises.

“A cultural hotspot like downtown Austin deserves the ultimate Wi-Fi hotspot: one that requires zero effort to access public Wi-Fi automatically, securely and reliably,” said J.R. Wilson, AT&T vice president of tower strategy and roaming. “That’s exactly the kind of user experience AT&T is providing with Wi-Fi-certified Passpoint and WBA OpenRoaming. Once again, we’ve raised the bar for speed, security and convenience.”

Tiago Rodrigues, CEO of WBA, said: “This trial is the first step to proving WBA OpenRoaming technology in a dense, urban location. This will be further developed during the summer of 2021, and commercial developments will come onboard.”

WBA OpenRoaming eliminates the hassle of re-registering or re-entering log-in credentials because it does not rely on MAC addressing to enable users to join a network. Instead, users are automatically, securely and privately connected every time they are within range of a WBA OpenRoaming hotspot — including AT&T’s Wi-Fi-certified Passpoint Wi-Fi network in Austin.

 Source: Wireless Broadband Alliance

 

Product Showcase

Small Cell & DAS

Alden One

Alden Systems

Alden One plugs you in. The Alden One platform is a shared database of joint use assets and activities that provides clarity and control through business process automation. Alden ensures that our clients improve communication and work coordination—between internal departments and with external stakeholders—to streamline processes and speed up deployment. Alden One manages 40M+ assets for electric power utilities, communications companies, broadband providers, and their engineering and construction partners throughout the United States and Canada. Companies that choose to work together to help improve their communities choose Alden One.

www.aldensys.com

Birds on Blue

CellTech

The Birds on Blue project is a culmination of over 4 years of design and negotiations amongst the tower owner and design team. In 2016, CellTech partnered to provide its expertise in additional design, fabrication, and installation. Being both the General Contractor and Concealment vendor, the two phased approach had us fabricating in our shop and then on site for final install.


Birds on Blue represents the creative capabilities of bypassing structural augmentations, trees , cupolas, church steeples, etc and producing concealment that’s art.

www.celltechinc.us

StreetSmart Small Count Fiber Hand-Off Box

Clearfield, Inc.

Clearfield's StreetSmart Small Count Fiber Hand-Off Box serves as a network demarcation point between the backhaul provider and the network operator or as a demarc point for small count MDUs. Designed with a hinged plate and 216 locking mechanism, access is secured between craft responsibilities. The craft-friendly GR-771 box can be mounted aerially, on a pole or on a wall. The compact design makes it ideally suited for inside a monopole.

www.seeclearfield.com

A Suite of Concealment Solutions

Comptek Technologies

Accelerate small cell deployments with full, partial and non‐concealment solutions. Comptek solutions combine the structural, thermal and RF requirements of the wireless carriers with the aesthetic guidelines of communities. In addition to the CityPole® concealment smart pole solution and standard poles, Comptek’s suite of mounts, cabinets, architectural shrouds, and 5G shroud systems complement the company’s wireless infrastructure product portfolio.

www.comptektechnologies.com

A Suite of Concealment Solutions

Comptek Technologies

Accelerate small cell deployments with full, partial and non‐concealment solutions. Comptek solutions combine the structural, thermal and RF requirements of the wireless carriers with the aesthetic guidelines of communities. In addition to the CityPole® concealment smart pole solution and standard poles, Comptek’s suite of mounts, cabinets, architectural shrouds, and 5G shroud systems complement the company’s wireless infrastructure product portfolio.

www.comptektechnologies.com

Sub 6 Pole Top Concealment & mmW Shroud Mount

ConcealFab Corporation

ConcealFab’s Sub 6 Pole Top Concealment & mmW Shroud Mount is designed to house radios and mount a Sub 6 canister antenna. Radios are mounted near the antenna to minimize cable loss, with mounting points available for the addition of mmWave shroud if necessary. The shroud is passively cooled to keep maintenance costs down and is available in multiple colors.

www.concealfab.com

Cel-Fi Active DAS Hybrid and ERCES Solutions

Nextivity Inc.

Nextivity develops the award-winning line of Cel-Fi products that deliver cellular and public safety connectivity for enterprise, small business, remote locations, and vehicle applications. Cel-Fi Active DAS Hybrid and ERCES solutions resolve poor connectivity where signal is inhibited by building materials and environmental obstructions. Cel-Fi coverage solutions are leaders in performance, simpler to install, self-configuring, cost effective, carrier-approved, code-compliant, and unconditionally network safe. Cel-Fi is the go-to solution for offices, healthcare, hotels, warehouses, manufacturing, government, retailers, schools, parking garages, remote sites, and fleets. Learn why 200 Operators and 1000’s of Integrators across 100 Countries have switched to Cel-Fi products.

www.cel-fi.com

A Suite of Modular Solutions

NYM

NYM brings exceptional value and service to telecom industries across the country. Our commitment to innovation can be seen throughout our product line of mounting kits. Our products are designed to be modular and interchangeable, and provides many options for side pole mounts, pole top mounts, and radio cages.

www.nymfg.com

FiberScreenTM and PolyScreenTM Products

Peabody Engineering: The Cell Site Disguise Guys®

You see us everywhere and yet... you don’t! There are estimated to be over 4.78 billion cell phone users worldwide which equates to a LOT of antennas both big and small. We have a unique fabrication process and proprietary FiberScreenTM and PolyScreenTM products, which allow us to create unique and custom shelters and enclosures for each specific location. Our cell site enclosures are fully engineered, modular, bolt in-place assemblies that save thousands of dollars in labor and ensure a predictable, high-quality installation. The concealments seamlessly blend in with the existing architecture, adding value and beauty for many years to come.

www.4peabody.com

Guardian First Responder Safety Trip (FRST)

PerfectVision

PerfectVision’s Guardian First Responder Safety Trip (FRST) is a revolutionary new product designed to protect first responders and the public. The small device is easily installed on new or existing structures where small cell or DAS equipment is deployed. It protects an organization’s vital resources while maintaining critical infrastructure, limiting liability in the event that a structure is damaged and commercial power is not lost. Preventing harmful RF emissions from injuring unsuspecting emergency response teams or the general public should be the primary objective when establishing small cell networks in highly populated areas and maintaining FCC guidelines for exposure.

www.perfect-vision.com/

Small Cell & DAS Concealment Solutions

Raycap

Raycap is a proven thought-leader with a unique capability to quickly turn concepts and innovative ideas into industrialized, cost-efficient products, providing realistic solutions and support for any existing or next generation network infrastructure. The company provides small cell and DAS concealment solutions that blend seamlessly in any indoor or outdoor environment. If you’re installing 5G mmWave small cell applications our InvisiWave™, a fully tested and approved solution for concealing 5G mmWave radios, can effectively cover 5G antennas and radios while providing unique design solutions to help meet the needs of carriers and support the aesthetic requirements of municipalities.

www.raycap.com

Concealment Solutions

Solar Communications International, Inc.

SCI has been hiding your sites for over 20 years, leading the way in product design and innovation. Count on SCI to deliver the products and services you need to satisfy even the toughest critics. Rooftop to mountain top. Parking lot to playground.

www.rftransparent.com

Wireless Camouflage Solutions

Valmont-Larson

Valmont-Larson is the industry leader in all types of wireless camouflage, including architectural and rooftop structures. Our custom designs are RF friendly, and our newest flat panel system offers an economical, lightweight concealment option. Whether developing sites in natural landscape environments, high traffic urban areas, or rural settings, Valmont-Larson designs, engineers and produces site camouflage solutions that provide optimal performance and blend seamlessly into their surroundings. Popular form factors include parapet walls, chimneys, smoke stacks, cupolas, steeples, wall boxes, and more!

www.valmontlarson.com

SimpleCell™ Small Cell Suite

Valmont Site Pro 1

The SimpleCell™ Small Cell Suite from Valmont provides you with a complete, all-in-one solution that simplifies your 5G and 4G deployments. When it comes to meeting the increasing demands for faster connectivity in this new 5G world, Valmont can assist with the products, services, and guidance necessary to help you navigate these new technologies and ease the complexities of deployment.

Our comprehensive suite of small cell poles, concealment options, decorative elements, engineering, and ancillary services, takes a traditionally complex process and simplifies it, enabling rapid deployment and ensuring that the aesthetic values of the target environment are appropriately maintained.

www.valmont-telecom.com
 

Company Showcase

Small Cell & DAS

B+T Group

B+T Group's small cell technology has helped us install 4,300+ nodes across the U.S. Our unique, whole-team approach cuts time to permitting by as much as 50%. We use Site360, our proven, centimeter-accurate comprehensive tower and site review tool, to perform virtual site walks and pole selection, providing excellent information.

Charles Industries, LLC

Charles Industries, an Amphenol Company, manufactures and sells small cell/DAS concealment shrouds, environmental enclosures, power and fiber terminals, antenna mounts and decorative poles. Download Charles' Small Cell Concealment Solutions Guide here.

Comptek Technologies

Comptek Technologies, an Aero Wireless Group company and developer of CityPole®, designs and manufactures innovative aesthetically‐pleasing 4G/5G concealment poles, shrouds, and mounts. Comptek solutions integrate smart infrastructure systems engineered to the technical and aesthetic standards of wireless operators, utility providers and municipalities.

NYM

At NYM we design and manufacture 4G/5G small cell mounting products. NYM products are aesthetically designed, durable, easy to install, and competitively priced. Our products are also designed to be modular for various configurations, and can easily be customized for a wide variety of radios and antennas currently being deployed.

Peabody Engineering: The Cell Site Disguise Guys®

Industry Leader developing quality modular concealment solutions for cell sites including macro, DAS, small-cells and raw fiberglass shapes and components for field fabrication. Our design and engineering team will ensure each detail matches existing architecture & keep installation simple. Pick, place & connect! Top of the line and cost effective.

PerfectVision

Since 1979, PerfectVision has provided solutions in voice, video, data, and technology. Helping to solve our customer’s most difficult challenges is what strengthens our customer’s success. We are a global leader in Infrastructure Product Solutions as a manufacturer and distributor supporting wireless deployments, WISP, fiber, MSO, and wire-line products.

Raycap

Raycap provides its Stealth concealment solutions for DAS & Small Cell networks in captive environments. With concealed light solutions that blend in seamlessly into any public venue environment, the company supports carrier initiatives to enable the rollout of next-generation telecommunications infrastructure in indoor and outdoor settings.  

Solar Communications International, Inc.

SCI has been hiding your sites for over 20 years, leading the way in product design and innovation. Count on SCI to deliver the products and services you need to satisfy even the toughest critics. Rooftop to mountain top. Parking lot to playground.

Valmont Site Pro 1

With an extraordinary combination of global resources and local expertise, Valmont Telecom is the industry leader in designing and producing engineered communications infrastructure. From our innovative SimpleCell™ small cell suite to our robust macro tower offerings and Site Pro 1 brand of telecom components, we offer the most comprehensive portfolio of solutions to be found in the telecommunications industry.

Valmont Telecom

With an extraordinary combination of global resources and local expertise, Valmont Telecom is the industry leader in designing and producing engineered communications infrastructure. From our innovative SimpleCell™ small cell suite to our robust macro tower offerings and Site Pro 1 brand of telecom components, we offer the most comprehensive portfolio of solutions to be found in the telecommunications industry.

Western Utility Telecom

Western Utility Telecom, Inc. is an AISC certified fabricator that offers a wide range of solutions to allow utility and cellular carriers to combine power transmission and telecommunication applications. Located in Salem, Oregon, Western Utility Telecom, Inc. is a leader in quality engineered steel structures and Small Cell/DAS applications ranging from in-house design to strict build-to-print solutions.

In This Issue  
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From The Editor

Where Is the Money for Carriers?

Oracle Communications, a company that offers cloud-native applications and secure network ...
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Technology for the Enterprise

Distributed Antenna Systems: How Implementing DAS Today Will Help Enterprises Prosper

Although much uncertainty remains as the world continues to move through the COVID-19 pand...
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Technology for the Enterprise

Overcoming Obstacles to Small Cell Construction in New York City and Beyond

Network operators and municipalities across the country are striving to enable 5G wireless...
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Antennas

AT&T Discovery District Showcases Antenna Concealment, Small Cell Poles

Click to watch Don Bishop and Trey Nemeth of Raycap discuss antenna concealment, small cel...
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Safety

Keep Workers Safe From RF Overexposure

The radio connections that everyone depends on for their daily safety, security, communica...
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Infrastructure Opportunities

Future for Infrastructure Provider Is to Own, Operate, Shared Radio Network

Ray LaChance, CEO of ZenFi Networks. A vision for wireless infrastructure provider ZenFi ...
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5G

The Value of Low-Band 5G

Stefan Pongratz, Dell’Oro Group. When T-Mobile first launched 5G wireless communications...
Pekka Lundmark, president and CEO of Nokia. -
Private Networks

Nokia CEO Sees Enormous Potential for Private Networks in 5G

The president and CEO of Nokia, Pekka Lundmark, gave a keynote speech at Mobile World Cong...
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Company News

Bentley Acceleration Initiatives Launches OpenTower iQ, a Digital Co-venture with Visual Intelligence and Aeroprotechnik for 5G Towers

Bentley Acceleration Initiatives has made available OpenTower iQ, a digital twin solution ...
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Wi-Fi

AT&T Brings Secure, Automatic, Friction-Free Public Wi-Fi to Downtown Austin with Passpoint and OpenRoaming

AT&T has completed a proof-of-concept trial of its Wi-Fi network with WBA OpenRoaming ...