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December 2020

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In This Issue

 - Source: https://www.fcc.gov
From The Editor

Open RAN for Wireless Carriers Gains Momentum

The radio access network controversy has its roots in national security concerns involving...
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FirstNet

FirstNet: Improving Communications for Public Safety

The First Responder Network Authority (FirstNet Authority) is an independent agency within...
 - Lisa Brissette tells town councilors about how the death of her husband on a remote road with spotty cellphone coverage inspired her to improve rural emergency cellphone service. Credit: Chris Bouchard / Aroostook Republican & News
FirstNet

The FirstNet Network Expands Across Maine to Advance Public Safety Communications Capabilities

Maine’s first responders are getting a major boost in their wireless communications with t...
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FCC Security

How to Succeed with Open RAN

There should be little doubt about the importance of wireless technologies and devices in ...
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FCC Huawei Security

Open RAN to Help Defeat Chinese Espionage Via Cell Systems

The United States was once a worldwide leader in telecom network hardware. Companies like ...
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FCC Huawei Security

Open RANs Help to Overcome Huawei Security Concerns

Next-generation 5G wireless networks will be embedded in almost every aspect of our societ...
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FCC Security

The Extraordinary Potential for Open RAN

Open RAN has extraordinary potential for our economy and national security. That combinati...
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FCC Security

Open RANs Improve Service and Security, and Create More Jobs

The transition underway to open radio access networks (O-RANs) is a big deal. To me, when ...
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5G FCC Huawei

Huawei Ban Participation Grows; Clean Network Initiative Coalition Expands

As secretary of state, I have spent a lot of time addressing the China challenge. The Chin...
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5G Business Horizons

5G Set to Add $8 Trillion to Global GDP by 2030

5G-enabled industries have the potential to deliver $8 trillion in value to the global eco...
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5G Horizons

LTE and 5G Broadcast Market Size Worth $1.6 Billion by 2027

The global LTE and 5G broadcast market size is expected to reach $1.65 billion by 2027 acc...
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Horizons

Small Cells Fill a Growing Role Supporting Overall RANs

Preliminary estimates suggest the small cell radio access network (RAN) market (excluding ...
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Alternative Energy

Can Wind Energy Provide Power for Telecom?

Weather extremes all over the planet have become the norm. In the United States, wildfires...
 - Source: https://www.fcc.gov
Source: https://www.fcc.gov
From The Editor

Open RAN for Wireless Carriers Gains Momentum

The radio access network controversy has its roots in national security concerns involving Chinese vendors.

“The broad trend towards open architectures with increasing virtualization will accelerate,” said Pekka Lundmark, president and CEO of Nokia, talking about open radio access networks, or open RANs. The term radio access network refers to cellular system base stations and software-defined networking.

First, the U.S. government has declared the use of Huawei equipment by cellular carriers in 5G wireless communications networks to be a security risk and has barred its use.

Second, a billion dollars’ worth of Huawei equipment already has been installed.

Third, installing open-RAN equipment is supposed to allow carriers to use competing manufacturers’ technologies for lower prices.

Fourth, taxpayers will pay for replacement equipment under the Secure and Trusted Communications Network Reimbursement Program.

On Nov. 23, House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Chairman Frank Pallone and Ranking Member Greg Walden sent FCC Chairman Ajit Pai a letter, urging him to assist companies financially. The companies in question mostly are small communications providers — rural cellular companies — eligible for reimbursement for the cost of removing and replacing suspect network equipment.

FCC Chairman Ajit Pai said that traditionally, wireless networks rely on a closed architecture in which a single vendor supplies many or all the components between network base stations and the core. He said open RANs can fundamentally disrupt this marketplace, leading to an exponential growth in the number and diversity of suppliers, more cost-effective solutions — and place the keys to security in the hands of network operators, as opposed to a Chinese vendor.

Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel suggested launching an open RAN testbed at the FCC to bring together operators, vendors, vertical interests and government agencies.

Commissioner Brendan Carr said that the FCC needs to accelerate the transition to open RAN so smaller providers looking to use the rip-and-replace dollars have confidence that they have a real choice, and open RAN vendors have a real shot at competing for their business.

Commissioner Geoffrey Starks said no carrier should be forced to adopt open RAN. Nevertheless, he said their consideration of open RAN would encourage global competition with Huawei, capitalize on U.S. software advantages, accelerate the development of open RAN as a product model and a business case, and allow alternative vendors to enter the market and offer specific network solutions.

Commissioner Michael O’Reilly also said the process should be voluntary. He said open RAN can reduce threats to overall network security.

A report written by Caroline Gabriel, the research director and an analyst at Rethink Technology Research, forecasts that open RAN will be deployed at 65 percent of all cell sites by 2026, accelerating fastest with small cells. Her report says open RAN will account for 58 percent of total RAN spending at $32 billion.

Over at Dell’Oro Group, vice president and analyst Stefan Pongratz projects the total RAN spend will approach $70 billion to $80 billion for the combined 2020 and 2021 period. He said that although Dell’Oro Group correctly identified that the RAN market would appear disconnected from the underlying economy throughout this year, it underestimated the pace and the magnitude of 5G rollouts, calling it an acceleration at a torrid pace.

Here is how Pekka Lundmark sums things up:

“Telco operators will continue to need to support massive capacity demands with commensurate cost increases. As a result, we expect capex to remain constrained, as operators will look to drive a step-change in cost effectiveness.

“The broad trend towards open architectures with increasing virtualization will accelerate. This will be driven by cost pressures as well as the need to increase speed and agility.

“Adoption will vary widely and a full transition is more than a decade away, but the shift to more open interfaces, virtualization and cloudification, network function disaggregation, AI-driven automation and optimization is well underway.”

Huawei has every incentive to continue marketing proprietary radio access network equipment, wherever it can. For the United States and many other countries with security concerns, momentum increases in favor of open RAN.

Don Bishop, executive editor and associate publisher, AGL Magazine

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FirstNet

FirstNet: Improving Communications for Public Safety

The First Responder Network Authority (FirstNet Authority) is an independent agency within the Department of Commerce’s National Telecommunications and Information Administration that oversees a communications network dedicated to emergency responders and the public safety community. The FirstNet Authority was established after the events of Sept. 11, 2001, to create a nationwide broadband network specifically for first responders.

9/11 Spurred New Communication Solutions

The tragedies of Sept. 11, 2001, revealed fundamental problems within the nation’s first responder communication systems. Radios did not easily operate across different agencies, and phone lines were overwhelmed by high call volumes.

Scott StekrEdward Parkinson, chief executive officer of the First Responder Network AuthorityThe 9/11 Commission examined the circumstances of the attacks and issued a report in 2004. The report captured the communication challenges faced by first responders and recommended creating a single communications network for all public safety agencies.

In the years after the report’s release, the public safety community worked diligently to urge Congress to pass legislation establishing a reliable, dedicated, and nationwide high-speed network for first responders. As a result of public safety’s advocacy, the FirstNet Authority was created by the Middle Class Tax Relief and Job Creation Act, signed into law in February 2012. The law allocated $7 billion and 20 megahertz of broadband spectrum to establish a network for first responders while also establishing the FirstNet Authority to ensure the buildout, operation, and maintenance of that network.

A Nationwide Communications Network for Public Safety

Since 2012, the FirstNet Authority has collaborated with states, territories and tribal governments to understand and incorporate public safety’s unique communication needs into the network’s plans. Today, public safety’s nationwide broadband network, called FirstNet, is a reality.

Launched in 2018, FirstNet is built through a first-of-its-kind private-public partnership with AT&T. Now, two and a half years into the five-year initial buildout, first responders throughout the country are using FirstNet to save lives and keep communities safe.

One of FirstNet’s priorities is expanding coverage for first responders in rural areas of the country. When tornadoes ripped through rural northeast Arkansas in March, FirstNet powered the response efforts. “After the tornado passed, the area was inundated with first responders from all over. My FirstNet service was never interrupted, no dropped calls or call failure, and the internet was spot on,” said City of Bay Chief of Police Paul Keith.

Fostering Innovations in Response and Resiliency Technologies

FirstNet offers benefits beyond a dedicated wireless connection. The network has a growing list of apps, devices and capabilities that are innovative, reliable, accessible and secure.

The Junction City Fire Department in Kansas is part of regional search and rescue task force that responds to disasters using a smartphone app connected via FirstNet. When canvassing a disaster’s damages, injuries and hazards, the team uses the app to share assessments in real time. If one team determines a bridge is unsafe, all other teams know immediately and can re-route traffic. In the past, canvassers would return to headquarters to import information. With FirstNet, search and rescue teams have the benefit of real-time information.

Building the Future of Emergency Communications with Public Safety

With more than 13,000 subscribing agencies and over 1.5 million connections, FirstNet is growing. The FirstNet Authority continues to work hand-in-hand with the public safety community to modernize public safety communications and keep America safe every day and in every emergency.

Edward Parkinson is chief executive officer of the First Responder Network Authority.

 - Lisa Brissette tells town councilors about how the death of her husband on a remote road with spotty cellphone coverage inspired her to improve rural emergency cellphone service. Credit: Chris Bouchard / Aroostook Republican & News
Lisa Brissette tells town councilors about how the death of her husband on a remote road with spotty cellphone coverage inspired her to improve rural emergency cellphone service. Credit: Chris Bouchard / Aroostook Republican & News
FirstNet

The FirstNet Network Expands Across Maine to Advance Public Safety Communications Capabilities

Maine’s first responders are getting a major boost in their wireless communications with the addition of new, purpose-built FirstNet cell sites in Aroostook, Penobscot, Oxford, Somerset, Hancock, Kennebec and Knox counties. This new infrastructure is a part of the FirstNet network expansion taking place across the state, bringing increased coverage, capacity and capabilities for public safety.

On top of the purpose-built FirstNet sites, AT&T has also recently launched additional new cell sites in the following towns: Biddeford, Springvale, Buxton, Hartland, Easton, Dayton and Rockwood. AT&T also recently completed updates to over 150 recently acquired, existing cell sites across central and northern Maine, which will significantly expand coverage to many areas of the state. These sites have been upgraded with AT&T LTE spectrum and Band 14 spectrum. Band 14 is nationwide, high-quality spectrum set aside by the government specifically for FirstNet.

  Owen Smith, president of AT&T Maine Janet Mills, governor of Maine Edward Parkinson, chief executive officer of the First Responder Network Authority

“I welcome FirstNet’s commitment to enhance wireless coverage across Maine,” said Governor Janet Mills. ”This announcement is an important step forward in supporting emergency first responders as they conduct their critical work, in supporting the health and safety of Maine people, and in connecting more Maine people to our global network. We are grateful for our partnership with AT&T and look forward to our continued work to bolster coverage and strengthen our economy.”

Owen Smith, president of AT&T Maine, said that AT&T is committed to reinforcing and enhancing its Maine network. “These uncertain times have highlighted just how important fast, reliable communication tools are to all of us, from students and teachers to doctors and nurses to families and businesses,” he said. “Through strong partnerships and by utilizing an array of innovative resources, AT&T is working to ensure Maine’s first responders and residents have the best possible coverage now and in the future. We are grateful to Governor Mills, the state of Maine and all those involved in helping bring about these important enhancements and those still to come.” 

Prioritizing Public Safety Communications

FirstNet is the only nationwide, high-speed broadband communications platform dedicated to and purpose-built for America’s first responders and the extended public safety community. AT&T built the network in a public-private partnership with the First Responder Network Authority (FirstNet Authority), an independent agency within the federal government.

“FirstNet is a dedicated broadband platform for public safety, by public safety,” said FirstNet Authority CEO Edward Parkinson. “We worked hand-in-hand with Maine’s public safety community to understand their needs for the network. These network enhancements are a prime example of how that input and feedback is becoming reality. We look forward to supporting the state’s first responders’ use of FirstNet to help them save lives and protect communities.”

In memory of my husband Arthur, this is heartwarming for myself, my daughter and our family. — Lisa Brissette

State and public safety stakeholders identified the new FirstNet sites as priority locations. Where first responders need connectivity is FirstNet’s concern, every day and in every emergency. This concern provides the motivation for building the network. The sites in Maine were constructed using a combination of Band 14 spectrum and AT&T commercial spectrum. AT&T has also deployed Band 14 on sites across Maine.

One of the first sites to be completed in this phase of Maine’s FirstNet project is in Van Buren, Maine. Van Buren was the site of a tragic accident that claimed the life of Arthur Brissette in January 2017 and brought to light the critical need for reliable communications in this area of the state. Although Brissette was not an AT&T customer at the time of his death, we worked closely with several state agencies after the accident to prioritize the area and bring improved communications to Maine’s rural areas.

“In memory of my husband Arthur, this is heartwarming for myself, my daughter and our family,” said Lisa Brissette, Arthur Brissette’s widow. “I take some comfort in knowing the fate he suffered that day has not gone unnoticed, and he would be proud to know what has been done to save people in need of help in the future.”

FirstNet is built for all public safety, and connecting remote parts of America is one of our top priorities. We’re also collaborating with rural network providers to help build out additional LTE coverage and extend FirstNet’s reach in rural communities.

In addition to further elevating public safety’s connected experience in support of their emergency response, this new infrastructure will also help improve the overall coverage experience for AT&T wireless customers in the area. Residents, visitors and businesses can take advantage of the AT&T spectrum bands, as well as Band 14 when additional capacity is available.

Source: First Responder Network Authority

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FCC Security

How to Succeed with Open RAN

There should be little doubt about the importance of wireless technologies and devices in today’s society, both for consumers and businesses. Almost every American uses or interacts with wireless services, in one form or another, in their daily lives. The question becomes whether these wireless communications — especially those prevalent in the envisioned future of 5G licensed services — are sufficiently protected from certain nation states, rogue organizations, troubled individuals or a combination thereof, each of which may be intending to engage in nefarious or harmful activities against Americans and the rest of the world.

Michael O’Rielly, FCC commissionerMichael O’Rielly, FCC commissioner

The advent of Open RAN provides one path to potentially minimizing exposure points. In its simplest conceptual terms, Open RAN can be considered analogous to secure interoperability. By breaking wireless networks into components and moving away from end-to-end product lines, overall security can actually be improved. Whether it is reducing reliance on foreign manufacturing or providing incentives to harden physical infrastructure and protect corresponding software from intrusions, Open RAN can reduce threats to overall network security, if done properly, and give users the necessary confidence to transmit even the most sensitive data at any time and from any location.

Here are three conditions essential to ensure the success of Open RAN:

First, it must be done without any technological mandates imposed by the U.S. government or any other government or intergovernmental body, for that matter. The FCC and certainly other government entities lack the capabilities and requisite knowledge to impose specific network design requirements or other such directives on the private sector. This point has been proven time and time again, but it bears repeating here.

Second, we must maintain vendor neutrality. That means no single company or select set of companies should be blessed or favored by the government over others that provide the same functionality. We must not pick winners and losers, especially since doing so can stymie the advancement of ideas and innovation.

Third, and related to the first two, the process must remain voluntary. Certain companies may have nuanced views of how to develop and implement the new technology, and they should be permitted to proceed as they see fit. The market will sift the best ideas and ultimately determine which approaches work best.

Michael O’Rielly is an FCC commissioner. Edited for length and style, this article comes from his remarks at the FCC’s Forum on 5G Open Radio Access Networks on Sept. 14, 2020.

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FCC Huawei Security

Open RAN to Help Defeat Chinese Espionage Via Cell Systems

The United States was once a worldwide leader in telecom network hardware. Companies like Lucent and Motorola led the world in the design and manufacture of telecom equipment, from the radio antennas to the core. Unfortunately, however, American leadership in this market disappeared over time. While many factors were at work, American telecom carriers were eventually left without a reasonable domestic option.

Geoffrey StarksGeoffrey Starks, FCC commissioner

The timing could not have been worse, because the Chinese government’s Made in China 2025 strategy decisively tilted the playing field in favor of its own telecom equipment manufacturers. Chinese government support artificially lowered Huawei and ZTE’s prices, assisted in their research and product development, and undercut international competition. This was not free-market competition, but part of a strategy to turn economic power into geopolitical dominance. Through this unfair advantage, the equipment produced by these companies has become pervasive around the world, and even reaches U.S. networks.

This isn’t just economic gamesmanship. According to our intelligence agencies, in exchange for this subsidization, Chinese corporations have siphoned data, allowed backdoor access to state agencies and enabled functionality for network disruption. As a result, the technological foundation of our communications networks has been weaponized.

Congress and the FCC have recognized the problem of untrustworthy equipment in U.S. networks and are working to ensure its removal and replacement. Open RAN networks may be part of the solution. Almost exactly a year ago today, I published an op ed advocating for the development and use of software-enabled, virtualized 5G infrastructure to replace suspect equipment. Our country has long been a technology leader in software and wireless technology — growing our capability to make secure infrastructure makes sense from both a security and an economic standpoint.

We need to invest in this technology. And we must do some deep and proactive thinking on the best policies to effectuate our goals of promoting secure telecommunications networks that benefit our shared future and get the best value for the American tax-payer where we need to rip and replace insecure, Chinese equipment. So here’s a new idea:

I recommend that we explore that each rip-and-replace carrier rebuilding its network be required to consider solutions offered by an O-RAN provider. That would achieve many of our goals, including encouraging global competition with Huawei, capitalizing on U.S. software advantages, accelerating the development of O-RAN as a product-model and a business-case, and allowing for alternative vendors to enter the market and offer specific network solutions. Although no carrier should be forced to adopt it, it would encourage carriers to consider a technology that might have been overlooked otherwise.

O-RAN holds tremendous promise. Its growth could advance American technological leadership, enhance competition, and reduce our reliance on foreign vendors, all while bringing down replacement costs. It deserves serious consideration.

Geoffrey Starks is an FCC commissioner. Edited for length and style, this article comes from his remarks at the FCC’s Forum on 5G Open Radio Access Networks on Sept. 14, 2020.

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FCC Huawei Security

Open RANs Help to Overcome Huawei Security Concerns

Next-generation 5G wireless networks will be embedded in almost every aspect of our society and economy — from businesses to homes, hospitals to transportation networks, manufacturing to the power grid.

Over the past few years, the FCC has aggressively executed our 5G FAST plan to secure American’s leadership in 5G. This strategy features three key parts: freeing up commercial radio-frequency spectrum, promoting wireless infrastructure and encouraging fiber deployment.

This strategy has yielded significant results. For example, we have completed multiple spectrum auctions that have repurposed huge swaths of spectrum for 5G. Also, we have seen record-breaking capital investments in infrastructure essential for next-generation networks.

Ajit Pai FCC chairmanAjit Pai, chairman of the FCC

However, our focus is not limited to promoting networks that are strong. We also are committed to making sure that they are secure.

For years, U.S. government officials have expressed concern about the national security threats posed by certain foreign communications equipment providers. To address this concern, we have aimed to protect the integrity of the communications supply chain — that is, the process by which products and services are manufactured, distributed, sold and, ultimately, integrated into our communications networks.

Specifically, the FCC has prohibited the use of money from our Universal Service Fund to purchase or obtain any equipment or services produced or provided by companies that the Commission determines pose a national security threat, namely Huawei and ZTE. We also initiated a process to identify and catalog insecure equipment used in USF-funded communications networks so that we can, hopefully, implement a program to remove and replace it once Congress appropriates funds for this purpose.

Looking to the next generation of wireless technology, much of the equipment at the heart of 5G networks currently comes from just a few global suppliers. Three of the most prominent are Sweden’s Ericsson, Finland’s Nokia and South Korea’s Samsung, but the largest of them is the Chinese company Huawei.

Carriers building out 5G networks rightfully worry that Huawei equipment could expose them to security risks. Huawei’s market power, aided by generous subsidies from the Chinese Communist Party, often might seem to make that company the cheapest and thus best option for network equipment. Nevertheless, the Chinese National Intelligence Law requires companies like Huawei to cooperate with, and keep secret, State intelligence work. The law also creates opportunities for Chinese intelligence agencies to compel access to an organization’s facilities, including communications equipment, in certain cases. In short, many are recognizing that you get what you pay for, and that the long-term costs of using insecure equipment are most likely to outweigh any short-term savings.

In addition to these security issues, carriers may be concerned by a relatively consolidated marketplace. Some have told me, both here and abroad, that vendor diversity is useful in terms of price competition, avoiding the lock-in problem and ensuring a backup supplier, among other things. Technological innovation has opened up a new path to address these concerns. That technology is Open Radio Access Networks, or Open RANs.

Open RANs could transform 5G network architecture, costs, and security. Traditionally, wireless networks rely on a closed architecture in which a single vendor supplies many or all the components between network base stations and the core. But Open RANs can fundamentally disrupt this marketplace. We could see an exponential growth in the number and diversity of suppliers. We could see more cost-effective solutions. Also, critically, we could see the keys to security in the hands of network operators, as opposed to a Chinese vendor. All this may explain why some telecom companies are beginning to develop and deploy open, interoperable, standards-based and virtualized radio access networks.

As an added bonus, many of the leading firms in the Open RAN space are based in the United States or in countries generally aligned with our vision of 5G security.

How this marketplace will evolve is difficult to predict with certainty. However, here is what I can say with confidence: Innovation and competition make for a stronger, healthier telecom ecosystem. That is why so many are excited about Open RAN’s potential.

The FCC wants to encourage research and development into innovative network solutions. One way to do that is by convening the top experts in the field to discuss the benefits of Open RAN, the challenges of implementing it and the lessons learned from deployments thus far — as we have done by convening our Forum on 5G Open Radio Access Networks on Sept. 14, 2020.

Ajit Pai is chairman of the FCC. Edited for length and style, this article comes from his remarks at the FCC’s Forum on 5G Open Radio Access Networks on Sept. 14, 2020.

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FCC Security

The Extraordinary Potential for Open RAN

Open RAN has extraordinary potential for our economy and national security. That combination is something to seize — especially right now in the early days of 5G wireless deployment.

Our 5G future is about connecting everything. It is about radically higher speeds and lower latency, opening up possibilities for wireless that we cannot even fully imagine today. If we do this right, it could render our smartphones the least interesting thing about the future of wireless technology. Because this technology will become an input in everything we do, bringing new effectiveness and efficiency to every sector of our economy.

Jessica RosenworcelIf we want to lead in the development of open RAN, we need to take action now to help build this movement from the ground up.— Jessica Rosenworcel, FCC commissioner

However, doing this right means putting security first. It means recognizing that this new connectivity introduces new vulnerabilities. To date, the FCC has focused its efforts in this area on limiting the deployment of insecure wireless technology by restricting the use of network equipment from Chinese companies. We have encouraged our allies around the globe to do the same. Nevertheless, we should not be lulled into a false sense of security by flashy and well-promoted decisions about hardware and Administration headlines about Huawei or ZTE.

That is because the 5G cybersecurity challenge is much bigger than simply dealing with a few Chinese companies. Restrictions on Huawei and ZTE are a minor fix for a much larger problem. Although we can ban a few specific products, services or companies, no country can isolate itself completely when we are connected worldwide. In addition, our national ambitions are far too great to be defined only in relation to a single country. We must focus now on our competitiveness, on strengthening our alliances around the world, and on reasserting our values by building a new market for 5G equipment. That is how we will restore American leadership and secure 5G.

Ultimately, this is what the open RAN conversation is about. It is about making the market for 5G equipment both more competitive and more secure. At Mobile World Congress Americas last year, I explained that if we can unlock the RAN and diversify the equipment in this part of our networks, we could increase security and push the market for equipment to where the United States is strongest — in software and semiconductors. That means we can increase vendor diversity and in the process increase competition and resiliency. Moreover, we will benefit from software-centric innovation in radio access networks and faster upgrade cycles than with traditional hardware. I have since testified about this idea before four different congressional committees. Thus, I can say with authority momentum is building.

Nevertheless, we have more work to do, because not everyone is convinced. Earlier this year, the attorney general of the United States called open RAN “just pie in the sky.” However, one company has already made it into the history books as the first to launch an open RAN network in Japan. In addition, open RAN hardware and software are projected to reach 10 percent of the total market during the next few years.

If we want to lead in the development of open RAN, we need to take action now to help build this movement from the ground up.

First, we need investment in research and development from both the government and the private sector. A bipartisan bill in Congress, the USA Telecommunications Act, would have the FCC provide $750 million to accelerate the development of open RAN in the United States. This is a good idea.

Second, we need to launch an open RAN testbed that brings together operators, vendors, vertical interests and government agencies. That is something we can do right here at the FCC. Even better, we can build this into our ongoing work with the National Science Foundation to authorize citywide 5G testbeds in New York and Salt Lake City.

Third, we need to build scale economies for open RAN technologies. This happens when we coordinate with other agencies at home and increase participation in international standards setting organizations abroad to help ensure no single vendor dominates networks. As we move forward with plans to remove insecure equipment that is already in our networks, we should consider incentives for replacing that equipment with open RAN architectures. We also need to build incentives for producing the next-generation chips that open RAN technologies will require — and that includes research into the use of gallium nitride chips, because early research shows it could be more efficient than traditional silicon chips for 5G technologies.

Jessica Rosenworcel is an FCC commissioner. Edited for length and style, this article comes from her remarks at the FCC’s Forum on 5G Open Radio Access Networks on Sept. 14, 2020.

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FCC Security

Open RANs Improve Service and Security, and Create More Jobs

The transition underway to open radio access networks (O-RANs) is a big deal. To me, when I think about this transition, I think back to one of the great unbundlings that we saw, which was the personal computer (PC) market in the 1980s. As someone born in 1979, I remember fondly those early 1980 days. If you think back to that period of time, IBM was dominant in the PC market. It was dominant in a way that was completely vertically integrated — everything from the hardware, to what we think of as the operating system (OS), to the software, was all packaged together.

With respect to the IBM of today, which is a highly different company, and we will hear from some of them to come. The upshot of that, back then, was a product that was clunky, that was expensive, and that really was only affordable for highly profitable corporations.

Brendan CarrBrendan Carr, FCC commissioner

In the 1990s, Microsoft came in and completely disrupted that vertical integration. It unbundled the PC market and separated out the hardware from the OS, from the software. Flash forward, and we all know what that step produced. It dramatically drove down the cost of laptops. It enabled many competitors to enter the market, from Dell to Gateway. Additionally, for consumers, it meant that they could actually afford to buy a PC. That unbundling of the PC market coincided with the buildout of the internet infrastructure across the country.

You put those two together, and that is why we saw Americans getting onto the internet for the first time in the 1990s.

That exact same dynamic, that exact same unbundling, is about to take place in the wireless infrastructure market. For those of us from a policy perspective, that is attractive for three main reasons. One is improvement in service, another is improvement in security, and a third is jobs.

From the service perspective, the unbundling means that everything went from consumers to wireless carriers themselves are going to be able to mix and match components and pick the best ones that meet their need. We will see competition across what used to be a vertically integrated market. That will improve performance. We already are seeing pieces of that effect.

For example, one rural carrier has been working with an O-RAN vendor, and the carrier is seeing a throughput improvement increase by about 40 percent, and it is seeing its cost cut in half with a virtualized core, plus O-RAN.

Those are some of the reasons that this will be important. At the FCC, we have been working on this for a number of years, now. I have been leading an effort to reform the wireless infrastructure rules to make it easier to swap out, upgrade and add new equipment. That is going to coincide with the desire to build out this O-RAN architecture.

The other piece of this is jobs. By unbundling, we open the marketplace to smaller providers that are experts on software. That happens to benefit many U.S. companies, which is a great thing, particularly when we are talking about buildouts that may be supported by Universal Service Fund dollars.

Many of these companies were represented at the FCC’s Open RAN Forum, such as Altiostar, Navingear, Parallel Wireless and many others. This unbundling is going to help spur high-paying jobs here in the United States.

The last piece is security. More than two years ago, the FCC launched an effort to make sure that Universal Service Fund dollars are not used to purchase s insecure network equipment. Many small, rural carriers concluded they had no option other than expensive bespoke pieces of Huawei gear. Although Huawei gear was relatively affordable for them for many reasons, including subsidies from the Chinese Communist Party, the gear came with what we perceived to be some security threats.

The question for the carriers is how do we make sure that they understand they have not only more choices, but also more affordable choices for secure equipment. That is where O-RAN is going to help. Many U.S.-based providers that have software expertise can create a secure network environment, virtually, something outside of a vertically integrated, and what we would view as insecure, Huawei gear. The big challenge for us and the opportunity for FCC Chairman Ajit Pai in convening this forum is to accelerate this transition to O-RAN. We want the private sector to have confidence that it can put this equipment and software into its networks.

One backstop that we had in mind is the rip-and-replace activity in which we in the United States may engage, with it costing roughly $1 billion to $2 billion to make sure we take all subsidized Huawei gear out of the network. We, as policymakers, need to accelerate the transition to O-RAN so smaller providers looking to use the rip-and-replace dollars have confidence that they have a real choice, and O-RAN vendors have a real shot at competing for their business. The rip-and-replace activity is one backstop on our minds for accelerating the transition to O-RANs.

We are excited about the disruption that will result from unbundling the network.

Brendan Carr is an FCC commissioner. Edited for length and style, this article comes from his remarks at the FCC’s Forum on 5G Open Radio Access Networks on Sept. 14, 2020.

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5G FCC Huawei

Huawei Ban Participation Grows; Clean Network Initiative Coalition Expands

As secretary of state, I have spent a lot of time addressing the China challenge. The Chinese Communist Party (CCP) is leveraging its technological prowess to erode freedom and democracy, here at home and, indeed, all around the world. That is why the United States has called upon our allies and partners in government and industry to protect our people’s freedoms and data from the CCP.

I am very pleased to say that a growing wave of countries and companies have banned Huawei and chosen clean vendors for their 5G networks. Now, the list has about 30 countries that are clean countries, and many of them are the world’s biggest telecommunications companies and nations. They are using technologies that make them clean telcos.

We have also rolled out the Clean Network, a coalition of like-minded countries and companies committed to protecting your privacy and cybersecurity from malign actors. The Clean Network maximizes connectivity without the risk from untrusted vendors and stops the CCP censorship of Americans. Today, each of you will determine how you or your company also can join our support of the Clean Network.

Pole-mount small cell cabinetU.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on video at the FCC’s Forum on 5G Open Radio Access Networks.

On a similar note, I support the FCC and Chairman Ajit Pai’s strong efforts to free as much spectrum for 5G as possible and to do so as quickly as possible. I hope that each of you will do that, too, because when Americans compete and innovate, we will win. Freeing spectrum will drive a fast build out of our own 5G networks and will stimulate innovation that will drive economic both to push technology into everything from manufacturing floors to telemedicine to autonomous vehicles. It is critical for our national security and that of other countries.

We want our friends to choose trusted 5G vendors for their network needs, not vendors tied to the Chinese Communist Party. The world does not want China’s communists hacking into self-driving cars, home appliances or medical tools. If innovators create open networks and deliver the best solutions, we will help citizens all around the world avoid these threats. Nevertheless, we need to be open; the spectrum needs to be open; and we need to do each of these things if we are going to achieve any of these goals.

It is very simple: Technology must advance freedom. That is what we believe in the Trump administration, and we hope you join us in these efforts.

Mike Pompeo is U.S. secretary of state. Edited for length and style, this article comes from his remarks delivered via video recording as played at the FCC’s Forum on 5G Open Radio Access Networks on Sept. 14, 2020.

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December 2020

Site Name: Thurmont

Site Owner: CTI Towers

Height: 180 feet

Location: Thurmont, MD

Year Constructed: 1998

Photography by Don Bishop

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5G Business Horizons

5G Set to Add $8 Trillion to Global GDP by 2030

Nokia’s research has found that 5G-enabled industries have the potential to add $8 trillion to the global gross domestic product (GDP) by 2030, as COVID-19 accelerates medium and long-term digital investment and value creation.

5G-enabled industries have the potential to deliver $8 trillion in value to the global economy by 2030 according to new research from Nokia and Nokia Bell Labs. The research indicates that the significant and wide-ranging effect of 5G on business and society is predicted to lead to a potential $8 trillion contribution to global GDP, based on aggregated regional forecasts of how wage growth, profitability growth and government revenue growth will be affected by growing technology spend.

The “5G Business Readiness Report” surveys 5G adoption among businesses around the world, providing a cross-sector view of the path to full 5G deployment.

This landmark report from Nokia underlines the potential for 5G to drive sustainable economic growth and define the next decade of innovation. The COVID-19 pandemic is forecast to further increase the value creation potential of 5G in the medium and long-term by accelerating digitization, particularly among the least digitally advanced industries.

The path to 5G wireless communications.The path to 5G wireless communications. Source: Nokia

The report also highlights a clear correlation between 5G deployment and business performance. Companies at an advanced level of 5G adoption were the only group to experience a net increase in productivity (+10 percent) following COVID-19, and the only group able to maintain or increase customer engagement during the pandemic.

5G-mature companies are also growing considerably faster than their peers: 49 percent of companies in the expansion phase and 37 percent in the implementation phase (representing the two most advanced stages of 5G maturity) achieved rapid growth last year, compared with 20 percent in the planning, 11 percent in discovery and 5 percent in passive phases. These findings show that the companies that are most 5G mature and, therefore, are most likely also to be the most advanced in their overall digital transformation, are having the highest effect on business performance.

Despite the economic challenges of COVID-19, a global boom in 5G investment will see 72 percent of large companies invest in 5G over the next five years. The report forecasts a rapid uptick in investment over the next three years as enterprises seek to expedite digitalization. A third of companies across all regions fear their competition outpacing them, should they not invest in 5G within the next three years.

Nokia’s “5G Business Readiness Model” reveals that across 8 economies  — Australia, Germany, Finland, Japan, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, the UK and the US — 50 percent of companies are at the midway level on 5G readiness, between initial planning, trials and deployment, compared to just 7 percent that are classed as 5G mature.

Nevertheless, significant geographic variations exist. For example, although 13 percent of organizations in Saudi Arabia and 12 percent in the United States rated as 5G mature, fewer than one in 20 were classified as such in Germany (3 percent), Finland (2 percent) and the UK (4 percent). 

Although many organizations are at the implementation stage, for most of them the maturity rating variation means that many of them are engaged in pilot projects or early-stage deployments, such as 5G mobile phones or limited 5G connectivity for fleet services or rural locations. Few have yet to exploit the true breadth, depth and potential of 5G.

On average, although the importance of 5G adoption is well understood, a significant investment gap remains. Among decision-makers, 86 percent said they have some kind of strategy for 5G, and more than a third fear being outpaced by the competition should they not invest in 5G in the next three years. However, only 15 percent are investing in its implementation, and more than a quarter (29 percent) of businesses are not planning any 5G investment in the next five years.

Donald Trump...organizations must start or intensify their planning now and accelerate business model innovation to remain competitive...— Gabriela Styf Sjöman, chief strategy officer at NokiaGabriela Styf Sjöman, chief strategy officer at Nokia, said: “As organizations across the world move faster towards deployment of 5G-enabled technologies, those who wish to be the first to leverage its potential cannot afford to lose more time. To capture the tremendous opportunities of 5G, organizations must start or intensify their planning now and accelerate business model innovation to remain competitive in a rapidly digitalizing global economy. Beyond investment in the technology itself, this will require digitalizing operations, processes and ways of working to capture the full potential of 5G.

“5G adoption is categorically shown to fuel business success. Organizations that have integrated 5G stand to benefit from advantages that go way beyond faster, more efficient and reliable network services. As 5G enables businesses to transform, it will also accelerate wider technological and economic trends, with unimaginable possibilities for global economies and societies. The cities, hospitals and factories of the future depend on 5G and the unparalleled ability it offers to move, process and store vast volumes of data. Moreover, the biggest challenges we face as a society — from climate change to the pandemic — can be better tackled through at-scale use of the data and technologies that 5G will unleash.”

Barriers to Adoption

The gap between enterprise awareness of 5G’s benefits and current levels of adoption suggests there are notable barriers to implementation. The research identified five principal barriers to 5G adoption for:

  1. Ecosystem availability: Limited availability of key infrastructure outside urban centers was cited by 28 percent of decision-makers.
  2. Education and understanding: Seventeen percent said a key barrier is that decision-makers within their business do not understand 5G, while 14 percent said they do not know enough about it themselves.
  3. Awareness: More than a fifth of technology buyers (22 percent) said that 5G implementation is not a current priority for their business.
  4. Cost and complexity: Fifteen percent said they were not confident their company would be able to implement the necessary technologies.
  5. Security: More than a third (34 percent) said that they are concerned about the security of 5G.

A Call to Action

The report identifies three key catalysts for change in order to bring about improved understanding, confidence and ultimately adoption of 5G. These are improved regulation, collaboration and willingness to innovate.

  1. A third of technology buyers said that government investment in infrastructure or subsidies to drive down costs would encourage them to invest more in 5G. Enterprises will not adopt 5G unless the supply from network operators is presented and priced appropriately, which in turn relies on governments and regulators making 5G spectrum in low, mid and high bands available and affordable.
  2. The lack of understanding that exists within some businesses around 5G must be directly addressed. Companies and consumers alike need more information about the technology and how it can both improve operations and solve real world problems, ranging from enterprise use cases to telehealth to green technology. 

  3. As companies better understand 5G, they must boldly move to overhaul their operations to accommodate it — for example, exploring how they could use 5G to streamline and more effectively monitor their mobile workforce, fleet or supply chain. You can view the entire interactive report here: Nokia’s 5G readiness report.

What’s on the 5G Horizon The 5G Business Readiness Report finds that 5G mature companies are growing faster and are the only group to have experienced a net increase in productivity (+10 percent) following COVID-19. Despite the economic challenges of COVID-19, a global boom in 5G investment will see 71 percent of companies invest in 5G over the next five years. Significant geographic variations exist among the more advanced 5G nations, with Saudi Arabia and the United States leading adoption.

Enterprise Research Methodology
The five stages of 5G maturity are defined as: Passive: The business has not explored 5G implementation in any formal sense; 5G has not been raised at a senior level. Discovery: The business is exploring the benefits of 5G or is gathering evidence to determine whether there is a business case for implementation, or both. Planning: At a senior level, the business has agreed to implement 5G or to lay the foundations for doing so in the future, and work is now underway to make this happen Implementation The process of physically implementing 5G hardware and software has begun or is complete, and the business is either already using 5G, or will start doing so in the next six months. The enterprise survey was conducted by Sapio, on behalf of Nokia. Nokia surveyed 1,628 technology purchasing decision-makers in eight markets and across six industry sectors: Australia (203), Finland (200), Germany (203), Japan (203), Saudi Arabia (202), South Korea (200), United Kingdom (207 responses), United States (210). The sectors were energy and utilities (208 responses), mining (119), manufacturing (455), public sector (271), healthcare (445), transportation (130). Respondents from companies of fewer than 250 employees were only permitted for energy and utilities and mining companies.

5G Growth in 2019Businesses with greater 5G maturity have been better able to maintain productivity and increase customer engagement in the challenging climate created by COVID-19. The most 5G-ready companies are also typically the fastest growing. Source: Nokia

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5G Horizons

LTE and 5G Broadcast Market Size Worth $1.6 Billion by 2027

5G broadcast will improve consumers’ overall mobile experience while offering them limitless data consumption capabilities.The global LTE and 5G broadcast market size is expected to reach $1.65 billion by 2027.

The global LTE and 5G broadcast market size is expected to reach $1.65 billion by 2027 according to a new study by Polaris Market Research (see Table 1). The report gives a detailed insight into current market dynamics and provides analysis on future market growth.

Long-Term Evolution (LTE) refers to a key standard used for high-speed wireless communication through data terminals and mobile devices such as smart phones, tablets and Kindle. LTE offers internet services based on Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM), Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS), Enhanced Data rates for GSM Evolution (EDGE), and High Speed Packet Access (HSPA) technologies. LTE boosts the speed and capacity by deploying a varied radio interface along with the improvements of the core network.

5G broadcast refers to the advanced wireless technology capable of improving consumers’ overall mobile experience while offering them limitless data consumption capabilities. The 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) has improved 5G broadcast services. Its Release 14 and subsequent Release 15 reflect the latest versions of the 3GPP services known as Further Enhanced Multimedia Broadcast Multicast Service (FeMBMS)

LTE and 5G broadcast market sizeTable 1. LTE and 5G broadcast market size, by region, 2016–2027, in U.S. dollars.

5G broadcast is also known as Enhanced Television services (EnTV), invented primarily to enable seamless delivery of digital television over present mobile networks. 5G services is the need of the hour for businesses and individuals worldwide, and consumers, mobile operators, content providers and broadcasters need 5G services through the existing mobile networks.

The prominent factors favoring the LTE and 5G broadcast market growth include rising smartphone penetration and a growing base of LTE mobile subscribers coupled with increasing demand for high-speed mobile devices, data services and ever-expanding video traffic. In addition, the increasing need for minimizing the congestion in network capacity also contributes to global market growth. According to the ABC News March 2020 publication, there is extensive network congestion in Australia mainly caused by the increasing number of people working at home because of the COVID-19 pandemic. This has boosted the demand for a wider-bandwidth mobile network, such as LTE and 5G broadcast, to minimize network congestion.

5G broadcast enables consumers to use limitless data while also enhancing their mobile device use experience, compared with traditional 4G LTE broadcast. The FeMBMS standard offers a band of high-power, high-tower (HPHT) advanced applications through the use of a downlink mode. The content providers and TV broadcasters have a significant opportunity to increase their customer reach by using 5G broadcast because the technology enables them to proactively and directly address the mobile devices. The rising demand for premium video content by consumers, including live sports broadcasts, is expected to fuel the 5G broadcast demand.

AT&T, Athonet, Cisco, Enensys Technologies, Ericsson, Expway, Huawei, Intel, KDDI, KT, NEC, Netgear, Nokia, Qualcomm, Samsung Electronics, SK Telecom, Telstra, T-Mobile, Verizon Wireless and ZTE are key players in the global market. The players primarily focus on product innovation and development, as well as acquisitions, to improve their product portfolios and to boost their geographical presence.

For instance, in December 2019, Videotron partnered with Samsung Electronics to deploy 5G radio access and LTE Advanced technologies throughout Canada. This strategy enables Videotron to boost the implementation of its advanced high-speed network. In addition, in February 2020, U.S. Cellular purchased 5G-driven New Radio (NR) technology from Samsung Electronics that has enabled U.S. Cellular to implement highly advanced outdoor and indoor internet connectivity services.

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Horizons

Small Cells Fill a Growing Role Supporting Overall RANs

Nearly 30 suppliers plan to support various forms of small cell technologies to capitalize on new opportunities with private wireless, CBRS, Open RAN and mmWave deployments

Preliminary estimates suggest the small cell radio access network (RAN) market (excluding residential small cells) approached 1 million to 1.5 million units in the first half of 2020, composing a double-digit share of the overall RAN market. Aggregate small cell growth is tracking slightly below expectations, partly because of logistical challenges associated with the pandemic. At the same time, small cell RAN revenues improved more than 20 percent Q/Q in the second quarter, adding to confidence that the bulk of these transitory challenges are in the past and are most unlikely to affect the long-term demand for small cells.

The global growth outlook for small cells remains favorable, underpinning projections that the technology will play an increasingly important role supporting the overall RAN network as operators and enterprises navigate new technologies, radio-frequency spectrum bands and use cases. Cumulative global small cell RAN investments remain on track to approach $25 billion in the next five years, advancing at a substantially faster pace than the macro RAN market. Helping to explain this output acceleration is broad-based acceleration across both the indoor and outdoor domains.

The high-level vision has not changed. We expect unlicensed Wi-Fi systems to coexist with cellular technologies. For upper mid-band deployments, operators will need to advance indoor deployments rapidly. Meanwhile, the sub-6-GHz micro adoption phase will be more gradual.

Sub-6-GHz small cells, including CBRS, are projected to account for more than 80 percent of the cumulative small cell market, reflecting the need for operators to complement upper mid-band outdoor deployments with indoor small cells to optimize the combined experience.

Since the previous forecast, we have adjusted the cumulative 2019–2024 outdoor micro-small-cell outlook upward, primarily because of a more favorable outdoor millimeter-wave (mmWave) forecast. With North American operators leading the way in mmWave, the upward revision is primarily stems from improved momentum in the Asia Pacific region. In addition to on-going large-scale deployments in Japan, Korean operators are moving forward with plans to deploy mmWave for hotspot and smart factory applications. Activity is also picking up in China.

Reflecting upon how we envisioned the market would unfold a few years ago, it is fair at this point to conclude that the outdoor mmWave market has surprised on the upside. At the same time, the indoor mmWave market has disappointed somewhat, reflecting the uncertainty about the timing of this market opportunity. Recent developments with suppliers, including Samsung, announcing the commercial availability of indoor mmWave systems add confidence about future growth prospects. Preliminary first-half 2020 estimates suggest the top five macro-RAN suppliers accounted for more than 90 percent of the small cell market. With nearly 30 suppliers planning to support various forms of small cell technologies capitalizing on new opportunities emerging with private wireless, CBRS, Open RAN and mmWave deployments, it will be interesting to monitor the dynamics between the incumbents and new entrants or small cell suppliers with weaker RAN footprints.

Dell’Oro Small Cells RAN Coverage

Dell’Oro Group’s Quarterly RAN and 5-Year Forecast RAN Reports offer an overview of the non-residential small cell RAN market by RF output power (pico and micro) and technology (LTE, 5G NR dub-6-GHz, 5G NR millimeter-wave), with tables covering manufacturers’ revenue and unit shipments. Dell’Oro Group’s CBRS Report offers an overview of the CBRS small cell RAN market opportunity. For a copy of the report, contact Dell’Oro Group.

Stefan Pongratz joined Dell’Oro Group in 2010 and is responsible for the firm’s Mobile RAN market and telecom capex research programs.

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Alternative Energy

Can Wind Energy Provide Power for Telecom?

Telecom towers have the opportunity to avoid service interruption when the electrical grid fails by turning to wind energy for supplemental power, or to use pure renewable power altogether.

Weather extremes all over the planet have become the norm. In the United States, wildfires throughout the American West break records year after year; heavy wind, rain and snow affect the Central and Northeastern states, and hurricanes barrage the Gulf and East Coast states with regularity.

These intense climatic disturbances perpetually compromise the power grid. In late August 2020, Hurricane Laura caused massive telecommunications outrages when it knocked out electricity and internet services, leaving hundreds of thousands without connectivity in Texas and Louisiana, affecting communications with storm victims and hampering rescue and recovery efforts.

With the need for telecommunications at an all-time high, is our infrastructure able to withstand the demands of our changing climate? In addition, should it contribute to climate change? Service providers use telecom towers to connect millions of Americans nationwide; yet, the loss of the standard electrical supply means that power can be cut off to the towers. Many service providers use diesel generators of various sizes and outputs to supply emergency-backup power. These ground-based gensets can, however, be compromised by floods, fires and wind, and limited access to fuel should conditions deny access, not to mention exacerbating the climate change problem.

Telecom towers have the opportunity to avoid service interruption when the electrical grid fails by turning to wind energy for supplemental power, or to use pure renewable power altogether. Icelandic energy solutions company IceWind offers a rugged wind turbine that can be mounted to telecommunications towers to increase reliability and avoid downtime.

IceWind offers a unique patented vertical axis turbine design that is omnidirectional and able to generate power in both low and high wind velocities. Tested in Iceland, by many measures the windiest place on earth, the compact wind turbines are built for endurance to generate power in even the most hazardous weather conditions. Their commercial line, the Njord (named for the Norse god of wind), will be available in the United States in 2021.

“We have tested our two commercial models on telecommunications towers in remote regions of our country during intense weather conditions, as well as in our capital Reykjavik to power outdoor advertising,” said IceWind CEO Saethor Ásgeirsson. “The results show that wind power from IceWind turbines can provide essential energy support for backup electricity, as well as for a sustainable, green energy solution, which all businesses should be implementing for the future.”

IceWind wind turbineIceWind offers a unique patented vertical axis turbine design that is omnidirectional and able to generate power in both low and high wind velocities.

The standard practice of relying on diesel gensets for power outages requires hefty operation and maintenance costs, staff and fuel expenses for consistent refueling, and replacement every few years at high prices that are passed along to customers. This fossil fuel machinery is detrimental to the environment and potentially vulnerable to weather conditions. IceWind has designed its industrial line to be implemented and generate power for 30 years with negligible maintenance. Manufacturing achieves such a long lifespan by using top-quality materials, including stainless steel, carbon fiber and aircraft-grade aluminum. The turbine takes advantage of unique failure safeguard methods, such as a triple-V-type seal to keep dust, liquids, ice and other foreign particles out of the generator, keeping it at optimal efficiency.

The compact Njord micro turbines stand 86 inches tall and weigh 187 pounds for the large RW500, a 500-watt model that can generate up to 3,000 watts, and the smaller RW100, a 100-watt model at 60 inches tall and 132 pounds providing up to 600 watts. IceWind’s innovative technology uses Savonius drag-type blades from a design that dates back to the Persian Empire, and Darrieus lift-type blades commonly seen on conventional wind turbines and airplanes. This balanced combination results in a turbine that generates power in both mild and extreme wind conditions, with start-up speeds as low as 4.5 mph, and the ability to operate at wind speeds as high as 130 mph (which is Category 3 hurricane-level). The innovative, hybrid blade set ensures aerodynamic stability, preventing overspin, while also ensuring power generation over a tremendous range of wind speeds. Njord is designed to work in perfect conjunction with telecom towers, weather stations, military outposts and other applications, featuring the ability to be attached to the tower frame at any height.

“We are more reliant than ever on our telecoms — more than half of all web traffic is on mobile,” said Daryl Losaw, the U.S. president of IceWind. “The companies need to anticipate the inevitable for power outages. The issue is not exclusive to major weather events: The providers have service interruptions regularly, even from minor storms, such as when a tree knocks down a power line. New solutions for backup power are needed, and we believe wind power can be that solution. Our industrial line is both resilient and resourceful. This is not only an application for backup power, but also an essential move into sustainability.”

IceWind also has a residential vertical axis wind turbine to provide or supplement power in homes, barns, studios and off-grid cabins. The Freya, a 160-watt model that is 60 inches tall, weighs in at 143 pounds and can generate 600 watts. Like the Njord industrial line, IceWind’s Freya offers a smart, simple design, taking time-tested technologies and bringing them into the modern era.

IceWind’s mission is to provide comprehensive and groundbreaking wind energy solutions while reducing global fossil fuel emissions. They design their turbines to function off the principles of full operability, reliability, flexibility and simplicity. Their Njord turbines are sustainably designed, machined and manufactured, and fully recyclable at the end of their lifecycle. With over 200,000 telecom towers in use in the United States, many of which are in remote, hazardous and crucial locations, renewable energy for ongoing, backup and supplemental power solutions is more critical than ever in keeping our communications infrastructure running efficiently, sustainably and reliably.

Sam Gerbus is a mechanical engineer with IceWind.

 

Product Showcase

Cables & Connectors

Lightning Protection, Surge Suppression & Grounding

Bondwasher

Our 2 hole lug washer line now includes the NEW BLOCKWASHER, like the famous 2 hole Bondwasher our new washer is used for the installation of a ground lug to the buss bar. The only difference is Blockwasher has 2 tabs one on each end and is installed on the bolt head side of the buss bar opposite of the Bondwasher, the "Tabs" keep the bolt from turning just as the lock washer keeps the nut from turning. Using both the Bondwasher and Blockwasher as a system ensures the integrity of the ground lug to buss bar connection. An additional bonus of using the Bondwasher System is easier and faster installation, as the Blockwasher Tabs act as a tool to hold the bolt head while tightening the nut with a wrench.

www.bondwasher.com

Site Hardware II ‐ Cables & Connectors

Huber+Suhner

Huber+Suhner introduces the reinforced NEX10 interface design to support 1/2” cable assemblies for Small Cell and DAS applications

• Robust design to support mechanical interface with larger 1/2” cable, while still mating with all existing female NEX10 connectors on radios, antennas, passives, etc.

• Same outstanding RF and PIM performance as the original NEX10 interface

• Larger cable size means lower loss, longer cable runs, and higher frequency support, for Small Cell, DAS, LAA, CBRS, and sub‐6GHz 5G applications

• Huber+Suhner is an original member of the NEX10 design consortium

www.hubersuhner.com
 

Company Showcase

Cables & Connectors

DX Engineering

DX Engineering is a premier provider of high-performance, low-loss coaxial cables and connectors for a range of applications. Cables are available in bulk spools, by the foot, in standard lengths with DX Engineering’s patented crimp/solder PL-259 connectors, or fully customized using the online Custom Cable Builder at DXEngineering.com.

Huber+Suhner, Inc.

Huber+Suhner provides high-quality systems and components that connect the infrastructure of the world’s wireless networks. With expertise in radio frequency assemblies, hybrid fiber products, RF‐over‐Fiber systems, and optical multiplexing, Huber+Suhner provides the products that make today’s evolving wireless networks work.

Mobile Mark Antenna Solutions

Mobile Mark designs and manufactures mobile and infrastructure antennas from 30 MHz ‐ 6 GHz. Custom RF Cable Assemblies are built‐to‐order, including specialty cables. Wide range of connectors. Use to connect site antennas to infrastructure radios or extend mobile antenna cables for large vehicle installations. Made‐in‐the‐USA and UK.

PerfectVision

PerfectVision is a full‐service manufacturer and distributor of wireless products. We proudly serve the telecom markets with a comprehensive product offering supporting outside infrastructure. Specializing in engineered solutions for cabling, antenna mounting, small cell deployment, distributed antenna systems, network solutions, and installation supplies. 7 Locations | Same day Shipping | Quick Delivery

Wireless Supply

Wireless Supply was founded by industry veterans focused in the in‐building, DAS and Small‐cell markets. In today's market, it is imperative that the highest quality of equipment is being installed! Higher Standards. Superior Quality.

In This Issue  
 - Source: https://www.fcc.gov
From The Editor

Open RAN for Wireless Carriers Gains Momentum

The radio access network controversy has its roots in national security concerns involving...
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FirstNet

FirstNet: Improving Communications for Public Safety

The First Responder Network Authority (FirstNet Authority) is an independent agency within...
 - Lisa Brissette tells town councilors about how the death of her husband on a remote road with spotty cellphone coverage inspired her to improve rural emergency cellphone service. Credit: Chris Bouchard / Aroostook Republican & News
FirstNet

The FirstNet Network Expands Across Maine to Advance Public Safety Communications Capabilities

Maine’s first responders are getting a major boost in their wireless communications with t...
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FCC Security

How to Succeed with Open RAN

There should be little doubt about the importance of wireless technologies and devices in ...
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FCC Huawei Security

Open RAN to Help Defeat Chinese Espionage Via Cell Systems

The United States was once a worldwide leader in telecom network hardware. Companies like ...
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FCC Huawei Security

Open RANs Help to Overcome Huawei Security Concerns

Next-generation 5G wireless networks will be embedded in almost every aspect of our societ...
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FCC Security

The Extraordinary Potential for Open RAN

Open RAN has extraordinary potential for our economy and national security. That combinati...
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FCC Security

Open RANs Improve Service and Security, and Create More Jobs

The transition underway to open radio access networks (O-RANs) is a big deal. To me, when ...
 -
5G FCC Huawei

Huawei Ban Participation Grows; Clean Network Initiative Coalition Expands

As secretary of state, I have spent a lot of time addressing the China challenge. The Chin...
 -
5G Business Horizons

5G Set to Add $8 Trillion to Global GDP by 2030

5G-enabled industries have the potential to deliver $8 trillion in value to the global eco...
 -
5G Horizons

LTE and 5G Broadcast Market Size Worth $1.6 Billion by 2027

The global LTE and 5G broadcast market size is expected to reach $1.65 billion by 2027 acc...
 -
Horizons

Small Cells Fill a Growing Role Supporting Overall RANs

Preliminary estimates suggest the small cell radio access network (RAN) market (excluding ...
 -
Alternative Energy

Can Wind Energy Provide Power for Telecom?

Weather extremes all over the planet have become the norm. In the United States, wildfires...